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I have a Visual Studio Project whose startup action is set to load the DLL in PowerShell like so:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Platform)' == 'Debug|x86'">
    <StartAction>Program</StartAction>
    <StartProgram>C:\Windows\SysWOW64\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe</StartProgram>
    <StartArguments>-NoProfile -NoExit -Command Add-Type -Path  "Foo.dll" -PassThru | Select FullName</StartArguments>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|x86'">
    <StartAction>Program</StartAction>
    <StartProgram>c:\windows\system32\windowspowershell\v1.0\powershell.exe</StartProgram>
    <StartArguments>-NoProfile -NoExit -Command Add-Type -Path  "Foo.dll" -PassThru | Select FullName</StartArguments>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Debug|x64'">
    <StartProgram>C:\Windows\SysWOW64\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe</StartProgram>
    <StartArguments>-NoProfile -NoExit -Command Add-Type -Path  "Foo.dll" -PassThru | Select FullName</StartArguments>
    <StartAction>Program</StartAction>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|x64'">
    <StartProgram>c:\windows\system32\windowspowershell\v1.0\powershell.exe</StartProgram>
    <StartArguments>-NoProfile -NoExit -Command Add-Type -Path  "Foo.dll" -PassThru | Select FullName</StartArguments>
    <StartAction>Program</StartAction>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Project>

I hand edited the file down to the following to remove redundancy:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <PropertyGroup '$(Platform)' == 'x86'">
    <StartProgram>C:\Windows\SysWOW64\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe</StartProgram>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Platform)' == 'AnyCPU' or Condition="'$(Platform)' == 'x64'">
    <StartProgram>C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe</StartProgram>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup>
    <StartAction>Program</StartAction>
    <StartArguments>-NoProfile -NoExit -Command Add-Type -Path  "Foo.dll" -PassThru | Select FullName</StartArguments>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Project>

Now I would like to replace the hard coded "Foo.dll" with something like "$(TargetPath)". However, that evaluates to an empty string. The following also resolve to an empty string:

  • $(AssemblyName)
  • $(TargetName)$(TargetExt)
  • $(TargetFileName)

Setting the value <StartArguments>-NoProfile -NoExit -Command Add-Type -Path "$(Platform)" -PassThru | Select FullName</StartArguments> does create the commandline "C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe" -NoProfile -NoExit -Command Add-Type -Path "x64" -PassThru | Select FullName

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1 Answer 1

Move your property declarations after all Import directives like <Import Project="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets" />

$(TargetPath) is initially defined in Microsoft.Common.targets, so it will not contain any value until that file is imported in the script. In case your properties are defined before imports (and before imported properties appear ) - during top-down property evaluation phase undefined properties will be resolved to empty strings.

NB:I mistakenly didn't notice you mean proj*.user* file, not original .proj file. I don't know when exactly visual studio loads .user files and what context set during it's loading. You can try to use definition from original .targets file. This is how TargetDir defined in Microsoft.common.targets: <TargetDir Condition="'$(OutDir)' != ''">$([MSBuild]::Escape($([System.IO.Path]::GetFullPath($([System.IO.Path]::Combine($(MSBuildProjectDirectory), $(OutDir)))))))</TargetDir>

If .user file loads without any previously build context - it still won't resolve $(OutDir) properly. So this is still uncomplete answer to your question =(

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I was actually looking through Microsoft.common.targets. Maybe just re-importing it will work. However, I don't want the $(TargetDir) I want the name of the DLL. –  Justin Dearing Oct 8 '12 at 14:15
    
This is actually depends on what environment .user file load into when VS starting. Unfortunately I can't find any info about that. I have serious doubts that it will be same\similar msbuild context as used to build project. You probably can try to include your original .proj file into .user - then it should load all imports and after evaluation phase you should have proper filename in $(AssemblyName). But it's way to dirty to use at all, imo. PS thanks for grammar fixes. –  Alexey Shcherbak Oct 8 '12 at 14:41

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