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An array can be converted into a std::vector easily and efficiently:

template <typename T, int N>
vector<T> array_to_vector(T(& a)[N]) {

  return vector<T>(a, a + sizeof(a) / sizeof(T));

}

Is there a similar way to convert a two dimensional array into a std::map without iterating over the members? This looks like an unusual function signature, but in my particular situation, the keys and values in these maps will be of the same type.

template <typename T, int N>
map<T, T> array_to_map(T(& a)[N][2]) {

  // ...?

}

Here's the test code I put together for this question. It will compile and run as-is; the goal is to get it to compile with the block comment in main uncommented.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

template <typename T, int N>
vector<T> array_to_vector(T(& a)[N]) {

  return vector<T>(a, a + sizeof(a) / sizeof(T));

}

template <typename T, int N>
map<T, T> array_to_map(T(& a)[N][2]) {

  // This doesn't work; members won't convert to pair 

  return map<T, T>(a, a + sizeof(a) / sizeof(T));

}

int main() {

  int a[] = { 12, 23, 34 };

  vector<int> v = array_to_vector(a);

  cout << v[1] << endl;

  /*
  string b[][2] = {
    {"one", "check 1"},
    {"two", "check 2"}
   };

  map<string, string> m = array_to_map(b);

  cout << m["two"] << endl;
  */
}

Again, I'm not looking for answers with code that iterates over each member of the array... I could write that myself. If it can't be done in a better way, I'll accept that as an answer.

share|improve this question
1  
You could write a custom iterator that consumes the double array, but would that be useful? It'd be a lot more code for sure. –  Kerrek SB Oct 7 '12 at 20:29
    
@KerrekSB I'm not sure it would be useful, I might as well just iterate inside the function. I'm wondering if there is some way to do it by casting arrays to std::pair or leveraging something else from the STL that I don't know about. –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 7 '12 at 20:36
    
Maybe std::copy with a specialized insert_iterator? –  Rollie Oct 7 '12 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following works fine for me:

template <typename T, int N>
map<T, T> array_to_map(T(& a)[N][2]) 
{
    map<T, T> result;
    std::transform(
        a, a+N, std::inserter(result, result.begin()),
        [] (T const(&p)[2]) { return std::make_pair(p[0], p[1]); }
        );

    return result;
}

If you have C++03 you could use

template <typename T>
static std::pair<T, T> as_pair(T const(&p)[2]) {
    return std::make_pair(p[0], p[1]);
}

template <typename T, int N>
map<T, T> array_to_map(T(& a)[N][2]) {
    map<T, T> result;
    std::transform(a, a+N, std::inserter(result, result.begin()), as_pair<T>);
    return result;
}

Full demo http://liveworkspace.org/code/c3419ee57fc7aea84fea7932f6a95481

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

template <typename T, int N>
vector<T> array_to_vector(T const(& a)[N]) {
  return vector<T>(a, a + sizeof(a) / sizeof(T));
}

template <typename T>
static std::pair<T, T> as_pair(T const(&p)[2])
{
    return std::make_pair(p[0], p[1]);
}

template <typename T, int N>
map<T, T> array_to_map(T const(& a)[N][2]) 
{
    map<T, T> result;

    // C++03: std::transform(a, a+N, std::inserter(result, result.begin()), as_pair<T>);
    std::transform(
        a, a+N, std::inserter(result, result.begin()),
        [] (T const(&p)[2]) { return std::make_pair(p[0], p[1]); }
        );

    return result;
}

int main() {

  int a[] = { 12, 23, 34 };
  vector<int> v = array_to_vector(a);
  cout << v[1] << endl;

  const string b[][2] = {
    {"one", "check 1"},
    {"two", "check 2"}
   };

  map<string, string> m = array_to_map(b);

  cout << m["two"] << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is exactly what I was looking for, thanks. I'll have to look into transform and inserter. –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 7 '12 at 21:15

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