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I am using MVC4 and EF5 codefirst. I have a problem whereby when creating a new data record with reference to a row with a foreign key, the fields of the foreign key row are set to null.

Here is a simplified scenario:

public class Person
{
  string name { get; set; }
  Color color { get; set; }
}

public class Color
{
  int id { get; set; }
  string name { get; set; }
}

The viewmodel:

public class PersonViewModel
{
    public Person Person { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Colors { get; set; }

    public PersonViewModel()
    {
        Context db = new Context();
        Colors = db.Colors.ToList().Select(t => new SelectListItem() { Text = t.Name, Value = t.Id.ToString() });
    }
}

The controller:

public ActionResult Create()
{
    return View(new PersonViewModel);
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(PersonViewModel personViewModel)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {   
        db.Person.Add(personViewModel.Person);
        db.SaveChanges();
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }

    return View(personViewModel);
}

and finally, the create view:

@model PersonViewModel
@using (Html.BeginForm())
{   
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)

    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Person.Name) 
    @Html.EditorFor(model =>  model.Person.Name)

    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Person.Color)
    @Html.DropDownListFor(model => model.Person.Color.Id, this.Model.Colors)

    <input type="submit" value="Create" title="Create ticket" />
}

Say I have two colors in the data: 1. red 2. blue

When creating a new person through the view and selecting blue as the color, the person will be created correctly but 'blue' with id 2 in color table will maintain its ID (of 2) but its name will have been set to empty.

Im sure there is a binding issue occurring here? Should this be supported as standard in the framework or do I need to create my own modelbinder?

Thanks

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Ack! Never never never never never do data access in your models. It's bad practice for so many reasons, especially in the constructor. That means that it will cause a database access every time the object is created. That may not sound bad, but the framework creates new copies of your models more frequently than you think. –  Erik Funkenbusch Oct 7 '12 at 21:24
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3 Answers 3

When a dropdownlist posts it's value to the controller, it only posts the value, not the name. Thus, the name will not be available to be bound.

You're going to have to lookup the value, or create a value that contains the name and value, and then parse it on postback to separate the two (maybe have a value of "2:Blue" and then do a string.Split() on it on postback.

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you should find that within the post that the model.Person.Color is set as a new Color instance with it's id set correctly. The standard model binder has done it's job but effectively you want it to have associated it with something from your database.

From memory you are missing the foreign key attribute or maybe you have it set using the fluent api.

The simplest option will be for you to do a db.Color.Find( model.Person.Color.Id) and assign that to the model.Person.Color.

This also has the added advantage of doing a referential check to ensure nobody has cheated by injecting a post value with the I'd of a colour that doesn't exist.

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When I look at the schema of the table, the foreign keys have correctly been added by entity framework automatically - I tried adding the [ForeignKey] data attribute but the update-database fails as the foreign keys are already in place. –  Adam Jenkin Oct 8 '12 at 20:54
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

So it turns out I wasn't correctly following entity framework conventions. By explicitly defining the foreign key column, entity framework correctly recognises the relationship and works as I would expect. Therefore, the new data model (adding the explicit foreign key column)

public class Person
{
  string Name { get; set; }

  int ColorId { get; set; }     
  Color color { get; set; }
}

public class Color
{
  int ColorId { get; set; }
  string name { get; set; }
}

and the updated view (binding on the new foreign key column):

@model PersonViewModel
@using (Html.BeginForm())
{   
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)

    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Person.Name) 
    @Html.EditorFor(model =>  model.Person.Name)

    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Person.Color)
    @Html.DropDownListFor(model => model.Person.ColorId, this.Model.Colors)

    <input type="submit" value="Create" title="Create ticket" />
}
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