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I want to have a list of constants like A, B, C related to integers 1, 2, 3

I know you can do like

class Example {
    public static final int A = 1;
    etc...
}

and

enum Example {
    A(1), ... etc;
    some initialization of an integer
}

But is there a way to do it like the public static final but as succinct as enums? When I use A and I really mean 1 I don't want to call Example.A.value or something like that.

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4  
variables in Enums are by default public static final –  Rohit Jain Oct 7 '12 at 21:08
4  
I don't understand what you want. Are you saying that public static final int is too long to type? –  Dave Newton Oct 7 '12 at 21:10
2  
"I don't want to call Example.A.value" - you're in the wrong language for that. Unfortunately for you this comes with static typing and no user defined type coercion. You simply can't have an enum be or pretend to be an int at the same time. –  millimoose Oct 7 '12 at 21:26
    
Alright, thank you everyone and sorry. Can I scream new at this any louder? –  Julian Oct 7 '12 at 21:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand what you're asking correctly, you want to do something like this:

enum Example {
    A = 1,
    B = 2,
    ....
}

There is no nice simple syntax for this.

You either have to write out some constants:

public interface Example {
    public static final int A = 1;
    public static final int B = 2;
    ....
}

...Or you can add some other value to the enum:

public enum Example {
    A(1),
    B(2)
    ....

    private final int val;

    public Example (int val) {
        this.val = val;
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return val;
    }
}
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@Dave, So if you read my answer you can see that is exactly what I said. –  luketorjussen Oct 7 '12 at 21:24
1  
Yep, reread and removed downvote. –  Dave Oct 7 '12 at 21:25
    
Will make my answer more clear though –  luketorjussen Oct 7 '12 at 21:25

I think the shortest solution is:

public static final int A = 1, B = 2, C = 3;
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If you really want to use Enum, then you can override toString() method in your enum, to get the value printed when you print your Enum Instance: -

enum Example {
    A(1), B(2);

    private int val;

    private Example(int val) {
        this.val = val;
    } 

    @Override
    public String toString() {
           switch (this) {
             case A:
                  return String.valueOf(val);

             case B:
                  return String.valueOf(val);

            }
            return super.toString();
    }
}

public class D {
    public static void main(String[] args) {    

        Example a = Example.A;
        Example b = Example.B;

        System.out.println(a);  // Prints 1
        System.out.println(b);  // Prints 2
    }
}

Ideally your above enum is just like the below class: -

class Example {
    public static final int A = 1;
    public static final int B = 2;
}

So, I don't see the necessity of using Enums..

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One way would be to use an interface, where variables are public, static and final by default:

interface Example {
    int A = 1;
    int B = 2;
}
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