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So I have an activity with a TextView to hold the score like so:

public class PlayGameActivity extends Activity {
    private GameThread mGameThread;
    private GameView mGameView;

    private Handler mHandler = new Handler();

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_play_game);

        final TextView scoreView = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView2);

        mGameView = (GameView) findViewById(R.id.gameView1);
        mGameThread = mGameView.getThread();

        mHandler.post(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                if (mGameView != null) {
                    scoreView.setText(mGameThread.getScore());
                }
            }
        });
    }
}

Then in my GameView I have the function declared like so:

class GameView extends SurfaceView implements SurfaceHolder.Callback {
    class GameThread extends Thread {
        int score = 0;

        public String getScore(){
            return Integer.toString(score);
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            synchronized (mSurfaceHolder) {
                if (something){
                    score++
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The problem is that mGameThread.getScore() always returns 0 as if score is not updated when it certainly is.

If anyone has any incite it is greatly appreciated. Also I have striped lots of unnecessary code out of the snippets above. If you want to see the full text you may do so here:

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's a better way to update UI data, use event / listener mechanism.

Sitting in a looped thread is not an OOP style programming. If the change of score happens in your app than you definitely have a handle to detect the change. Once detected, update the UI with one simple setText call to your textview.

Do not overcrowd your UI event queue stack as you (maybe unknowingly) do by calling post(....), this will make your UI less responsive to actual user interactions especially if you're doing it in a timed loop. Remember that the UI event queue stack is ONE for the entire system, it is meant to handle user's interactions with the device.

If you need to change UI component from non-UI thread use

     activity.runOnUiThread(Runnable); 

method instead of post(Runnable). This way you may have a bit longer executing code (although not recommended) defined in Runnable. Otherwise make sure that the code in post(Runnable) is very quick to execute and finish.

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In a game you sometimes need to "sit in a looped thread". Gamelogic or drawing threads might enforce this. For a normal app the event/listener pattern is highly recommended. –  WarrenFaith Oct 8 '12 at 0:47
    
The logic should be - if you can detect, or can engineer to detect the change then don't use waiting loops. That's a bad practice. There's no need to repaint the fence with the same colour every day. –  Nar Gar Oct 8 '12 at 1:03
    
Using an event / listener seems like the correct way to tackle my problem in English but I am having trouble with the implementation. If you could provide more detail particular to my specific situation. In the mean time I will try to figure it out. Thanks. –  mkatic Oct 8 '12 at 4:51
    
In your GameView class add a private Activity property and define the getter and setter methods. In the PlayGameActivity add mGameView.setActivity(this); right after initiating the mGameView variable. Then in the GameView, right after score++ add activity.runOnUiThread(soreViewRunnable); where scoreViewRunnable updates the score view. That's it. No need for looped checks and handlers. –  Nar Gar Oct 8 '12 at 5:24
    
Great this works but is this considered bad since it breaks the MVC pattern and has lots of talking back and fourth? I feel like just this line smells bad: playGameActivity.runOnUiThread(playGameActivity.updateScoreRunnable); –  mkatic Oct 8 '12 at 6:22
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Your Handler runs only once getScore() so you will always just get the initial value. You should try to use postDelayed().

mHandler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        if (mGameView != null) {
            scoreView.setText(mGameThread.getScore());
        }
        mHandler.postDelayed(this, 1000); // run again in 1sec
    }
}, 1000);

As Thomas mentions that Handler should not be used in such a way here is a quote from the doc:

There are two main uses for a Handler: (1) to schedule messages and runnables to be executed as some point in the future; and (2) to enqueue an action to be performed on a different thread than your own.

It fits perfectly in (1)!

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This isn't the way Handlers are meant to be used, as you're basically sending messages from the UI thread back into the UI thread. So I suggest that the Handler is used from GameThread. –  Thomas Calc Oct 8 '12 at 0:02
    
@ThomasCalc An easy and efficient way for constant UI updates are handler. So this is a valid and often used solution for this use case. –  WarrenFaith Oct 8 '12 at 0:05
    
I don't doubt that, but in this concrete case, when you're writing a value from another thread, the most elegant (and readable) place is to add it to the non-UI thread. It has reduced complexity with the same efficiency (and offers implicit synchronization, i.e. will work even if score wasn't between memory barriers). (The complexity is reduced because there is no need to add the additional delayed message sending. Moreover, sending delayed messages might not integrate well into future developments e.g. if you add a new message type -- think of serialization i.e. happens-before relationships. –  Thomas Calc Oct 8 '12 at 0:07
    
Moreover, your solution will not be in sync with the actual value of the score, because it's basically a polling in every second. E.g. if the score gets increased 3 times per second (i.e. in every 333th millisecond -- noticeable for the human eye), my suggestion will update the UI after a few milliseconds (= time of message dispatching within the underlying Looper), while your solution even might miss some values (due to the 1000 ms delay). –  Thomas Calc Oct 8 '12 at 0:11
    
I just read your edit: yes, it is good for future scheduling, but as I've written in the above comment, delayed scheduling is not the most elegant way to solve the current problem IMO. –  Thomas Calc Oct 8 '12 at 0:13
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From where else do you call mHandler.post(Runnable)? The code you posted adds a single message (from your onCreate) to the message queue of the main thread, which does not make much sense. This message is processed, will print 0, and then that's it. So if you don't periodically call this from somewhere, it will not print anything after the initial 0.

If you're calling Handler.post(Runnable) from somewhere else as well, then make sure you call it from the correct place. It must be called from GameThread each time you want to update your UI. Therefore, you will need a reference to mHandler in GameThread. E.g. the constructor of GameThread is a good place to do this (I wouldn't implement GameThread as an inner class, but to each his own). Once GameThread has a reference to mHandler, you can use mHandler.post(Runnable) to update your UI. For example:

    @Override
    public void run() {
        synchronized (mSurfaceHolder) {
            if (something){
                // IMPORTANT: see "important note" at the end of this Answer                          

                mHandler.post(mRunnable); // mRunnable is preinstantiated somewhere
                score++
            }
        }
    }

IMPORTANT NOTE: your GameThread probably uses a way to measure real time (i.e. it doesn't call everything in an infinite loop without any Thread.sleep(...). Therefore, "update score" messages to the Handler will not be sent excessively. If your game is turn based (and not realtime), then this problem even does not appear at all.

NOTE 2:: I checked your complete code, and it seems your game tick does not have any FPS regulation, i.e. you don't use e.g. Thread.sleep(33) or anything similar. Therefore, the solution I wrote above will send very many messages to your UI if your pirate collides (and your score will reach a very high value in a very short time -- I doubt that is what you want). In fact, your score value will probably overflow very soon, unless the collision ends very very fast. So I suggest that you add FPS balancing to your code, as all games do.

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Wrong, it runs in a loop without sleep(). –  WarrenFaith Oct 8 '12 at 0:36
    
It still needs to have a mechanism to schedule the game flow. For turn-based games, we wait for user input (to start the next turn). For scheduled (e.g. real-time) games with a main game loop, it must contain some sort of regulation mechanism (otherwise it's probably bad or incomplete design). EDIT: I checked the complete code the OP has linked to. Well, it is certainly not a good idea to update the game logic in an infinite loop (instead of using at least an internal logical clock), a waste of CPU. –  Thomas Calc Oct 8 '12 at 0:59
    
Correction: "to update the game logic in an infinite loop without any FPS balancing" –  Thomas Calc Oct 8 '12 at 1:05
    
With your update you are correct. Thanks for the attempt but it is event based so I do not think this is the best solution. –  mkatic Oct 8 '12 at 4:44
    
If it's event based, then all concrete implementations to update the UI will be very similar. (I don't see where it's event based, but I didn't have much time to view your code.) In other words, if it's event-based, then the solution will be pretty obvious, and there will be no risk to "overspam" the UI message queue. –  Thomas Calc Oct 8 '12 at 12:32
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