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I know I can init an array of JS objects like this:

var things = [
  {
    prop1: 'foo',
    prop2: 'bar'
  },
  {
    prop1: 'foo',
    prop2: 'bar'
  }
];

I guess I would call these 'anonymous' types (sorry, I'm using C#/.NET language).

What if I want these to be of the same prototype? So I have defined a constructor:

var Thing = function Thing() {
};

Thing.prototype.prop1 = 'default value';
Thing.prototype.prop2 = 'default value';

Now I want both the items in my original code above to be Things. Is there a good way to do this?

If I were to guess, I would say maybe something like:

var things = [
  new Thing() {
    prop1: 'foo',
    prop2: 'bar'
  },
  new Thing() {
    prop1: 'foo',
    prop2: 'bar'
  }
];

Which is basically C# object initializer syntax. What I'm trying to avoid is:

var thing1 = new Thing();
thing1.prop1 = 'foo';
thing1.prop2 = 'bar';
var thing2 = new Thing();
thing2.prop1 = 'foo';
thing2.prop2 = 'bar';
var things = [thing1, thing2];

Edit:

I should also note that my prototypes also contain some functions that are shared. Also in actuality I have arrays nested 3 deep, so its something more like:

{
   [
    { 
      [
        {},
        {}
      ]
    },
    {
      [
        {},
        {}
      ]
    }
  ]
}

Which is why I as hoping to just init everything inline like this and not setting each property line by line.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
var Thing = function(params) {
  this.prop1 = params.prop1;
  this.prop2 = params.prop2;
};

var things = [
  new Thing({
    prop1: 'foo',
    prop2: 'bar'
  }),
  new Thing({
    prop1: 'foo',
    prop2: 'bar'
  }),
];
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2  
Marking this as the answer because it worked best in my situation. It also allowed me to do optional properties, like: function Thing (params) { this.name = params.hasOwnProperty("name") ? params.name : "some default"; } –  CodingWithSpike Oct 8 '12 at 0:31
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You are not making use of your 'constructor'. Its preferred to initialize values IN YOUR CONSTRUCTOR:

var Thing = function Thing(prop1, prop2) {
    this.prop1 = prop1;
    this.prop2 = prop2;
};

and then do:

var thing1 = new Thing("foo", "bar");
var thing2 = new Thing("foo", "bar");
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I started down this path, but it gets a little odd because some of my properties are also arrays, so I end up with something like: new One("foo", [new Two([new Three(), new Three()]), new Two([new Three(), new Three()])], "bar") which just looks ugly. I think you are probably right though. I guess I was just trying to retain the property names, for readability. –  CodingWithSpike Oct 7 '12 at 23:56
1  
@CodingWithSpike, if you're going through the trouble of making a new class, you should probably be sure that you've got a use case for methods on that class. Otherwise, you're better off with object and array literals. Additionally, large amounts of static data are probably better left as a JSON data source. –  zzzzBov Oct 8 '12 at 3:10
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In this cases I add a "config" method to the object:

function Thing() {
}
Thing.prototype.prop1 = 'foo';
Thing.prototype.prop2 = 'bar';
Thing.prototype.config = function(data) {
    for (var i in data)
        if (data.hasOwnProperty(i))
            this[i] = data[i];
}

var array = [
    new Thing().config({
        prop1: 'foobar',
        prop2: 'barfoo'
    })
];
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Is there a difference between having a .config() and doing it in the constructor itself? function Thing(data) { for (var i in data) ... } which is basically @alcidesqueiroz answer. –  CodingWithSpike Oct 8 '12 at 0:29
    
Well, the main difference is than implementing it on the constructor executes the iteration over the object every time you create a Thing, doesn't matter if you need it or not, using .config() method you implicitly ask for it. –  A. Matías Quezada Oct 8 '12 at 0:33
    
Also, you can add the method .config() to any existing class (but I don't recommend you to extend native Types) –  A. Matías Quezada Oct 8 '12 at 0:39
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The following may work, is this something you'd want to avoid also?

var thing1 = new Thing();
var thing2 = new Thing();

thing1.prototype = {
    prop1: "foo",
    prop2: "bar"
};

thing2.prototype = {
    prop1: "foo",
    prop2: "bar"
};

Another thing I can think of is making the constructor yourself so it allows something like the following:

var things = [
    new Thing({
        prop1: "foo",
        prop2: "bar"
    }),
    new Thing({
        prop1: "foo",
        prop2: "bar"
    })
];
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That's kinda odd. –  JoshRagem Oct 7 '12 at 23:50
1  
Wouldn't that change the prototype that each object instance is based on? The prototype also has some shared functions, so wouldn't it loose those too? –  CodingWithSpike Oct 7 '12 at 23:53
    
@CodingWithSpike yeah it would =/ –  Jeremy Oct 7 '12 at 23:57
    
You cannot change the prototype of instances. Constructors have the .prototype property, who is referred to the hidden [[Protototype]] property of the objects created with this constructors. You cannot change this property (in a standard way), so what the first snippet is doing is adding a property called prototype to the instances who must be accessed by thing1.prototype.prop1 who has nothing to do with thing1.prop1 –  A. Matías Quezada Oct 8 '12 at 0:36
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