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i just made a person class and defined 2 overloaded constructors as u see then made an array of 2 objects but some error pops up !

why i get these 2 errors guys please ?? and what's the [-fpermissive] error ??

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class person
{
    int x;

public:
    person() {
        x=0;
    }
    person(int y){   //error
        x=y;
    }
};


int main()
{
    int n;

    cin>>n;

    person* Arr= new person[2];

    Arr[0]=new person(n);  //error
    return 0;
}
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2  
Post the errors. –  PherricOxide Oct 8 '12 at 0:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You didn't post the errors, but I assume they were,

: In function ‘int main()’:
:25:24: error: invalid conversion from ‘person*’ to ‘int’ [-fpermissive]
:11:5: error:   initializing argument 1 of ‘person::person(int)’ [-fpermissive]

You have two options. One, make an array of person pointers that point to person objects you create with the "new" keyword and that reside on the heap.

person* Arr[2];
Arr[0]=new person(n);

You could also make an array of persons and then set them equal to another person, which doesn't require the new keyword. These would reside on the stack.

person Arr[2];
Arr[0]= person(n);
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There are more than two options. In fact, the first option is categorically bad. If a dynamic array is desired, then the correct solution is std::vector. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 8 '12 at 1:02
    
@BenjaminLindley Unless you only need sequential access, then std::list would be better. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 8 '12 at 1:29
1  
@Code-Guru: Even with that confusion out of the way [deleted], I would disagree that "needing only sequential access" is a sufficient enough reason to choose list over vector. You need a really special reason to choose list, some advantage that vector does not offer (I can choose to access a vector only sequentially), and you need to make sure that advantage isn't offset by vector's own advantages. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 8 '12 at 2:49
    
@BenjaminLindley Certainly. I guess I need to be more clear when I make such brash comments. This was my round-about way of pointing out that such considerations need to be made when picking a correct solution (which still may not be the only correct solution). –  Code-Apprentice Oct 8 '12 at 3:07
1  
@Code-Guru, Benjamin I think the only time you'd pick a list over a vector would be when you need to add/remove elements without invalidating iterators. As for "only sequential access" vector would surely be better there too because it would behave better with regards to caching. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 8 '12 at 5:17

You allocated an array consisting of 2 persons, then tried to store a pointer to a newly allocated person into the first person in that array. Here's a minimal change to your code, using an array of pointers to person. (I'm not addressing whether this is good design.)

int main()
{
    int n;

    cin>>n;

    person** Arr= new person*[2];

    Arr[0]=new person(n);
    return 0;
}
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