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I'm having some issues using the atoi(s) function. I'm trying to convert a command line argument into an integer, but the integers I am receiving from the atoi function are acting strange. I have checked the variables holding the conversion and they hold the correct integers, but when they run through my program they do not work as they should. The program accepts three arguments; the program itself, the function number(1-3), and an arbitrary integer. For example, the command line instruction would look like lab4p2 3 10.

Functions:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Functions

// Sumation function adds all integers from 1 to the value.
int sumation(int x)
{
  int counter = 1;
  int value;
  while (counter < (x+1))
    {
      value += counter;
      counter++;
    }
  return value;
}

// Negation function returns the negation of the given value.
int negation(int x)
{
  int negator, value;

  negator = (x*2);
  value = (x - negator);
  return value;
}

// Square function returns the square of the input value.
int square(int x)
{
  int value;
  value = (x*x);
  return value;
}

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Main:

main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

  int inputval, functionval, value;
  double doubleval;

  functionval = atoi(argv[1]);

  inputval = atoi(argv[2]);
  doubleval = atof(argv[2]);

  printf("%i", functionval);
  printf("%i", inputval);

  if(argc != 3)
    {
      printf("%s", "Invalid amount of arguments! 3 expected. \n");
    }
  else if ((functionval < 1)||(functionval > 3))
    {
      printf("%s", "Invalid function value. Expected values: 1-3 \n");
    }
  else if (inputval != doubleval)
    {
      printf("%s", "Invalid value! Integer expected. \n");
    }
  else if (functionval = 1)
    {
      value = sumation(inputval);

      printf("%s", "The sum from 1 to the input value = ");
      printf("%d", value);
    }
  else if (functionval = 2)
    {
      value = negation(inputval);

      printf("%s", "%d", "The negation of the input value = ", value);
    }
  else if (functionval = 3)
    {
      value = square(inputval);

      printf("%s", "%d", "The square of the input value = ", value);
    }
  else
    {
      printf("%s", "Something is wrong!");
    }

}

All of the error checks work correctly, but functions 2 and 3 are never accessed (despite input) and function 1 displays an incorrect answer. Does anyone know what the issue may be?

Thanks, Matt

share|improve this question
    
You check that you've got argc == 3 after you've already used both argv[1] and argv[2]; if they're missing, your program is going to be unhappy. You convert the same argument twice, once with atoi() and once with atof(). It would be quicker to convert inputval to a double by assignment. Your problem is else if (functionval = 1) where you assign 1 to functionval and then check that it isn't zero (it isn't!). –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 1:06
    
Thank you, I adjusted the code so the amount of arguments is checked prior to using them. The reason I used both atoi and atof is so I can check that the input is an integer, whether it be: 2 or 2.0. If doubleconversion != integer conversion Then input is invalid. –  Matt Koz Oct 8 '12 at 1:24
    
You could use strtol() instead, and check that all the input string was used in the conversion. Generally, you use atoi() and atof() when you don't mind about error handling, and strtol() and strtod() when you do. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 1:28
1  
Compile with maximum warnings. e.g., gcc -Wall would have caught this error. –  Jim Balter Oct 8 '12 at 2:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
functionval = 1    assignment

functionval == 1   comparison

By the way, there's a typo when you get doubleval, too Now that I see that using argv[2] again with a different conversion function was deliberate, rather than a typo for argv[3], I'll instead suggest that if you care about conversion errors, you use something like:

errno = 0;
char* endptr;
long value = strtol(argv[2], &endptr, 10);
if (errno == ERANGE) {
  // Value was too big or too negative
} else if (endptr == argv[2] || errno == EINVAL) {
  // Not a number
} else if (endptr[0] != '\0') {
  // trailing characters.
}
// Value is OK.

which, if you use it a lot, is worth wrapping into something easier to call.

share|improve this answer
    
oh wow, what a brain fart. I think the typo you're referring to is "atof", but thats just the function for converting to double. Anyways, thanks for the help! –  Matt Koz Oct 8 '12 at 1:10
1  
@MattK, believe it or not, I know what atof does. However, I've never seen anyone convert to both an integer and a float by way of testing correctness. Why do you worry about them typing 12.5 but not worry about them typing 12times3? You should check out strtol, which gives you a better chance to detect errors. –  rici Oct 8 '12 at 1:25
    
'believe it or not, I know what atof does' -- then why did you say there's a typo? You should edit your answer, replacing that with the recommendation to use strtol. –  Jim Balter Oct 8 '12 at 2:11
    
I love strtol() ! –  Kyrol Jan 31 '13 at 11:49
else if (functionval = 1)
else if (functionval = 2)
else if (functionval = 3)

should be

else if (functionval == 1)
else if (functionval == 2)
else if (functionval == 3)

otherwise you perform an assignment not a comparison.

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