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I had this SQL Query working perfectly. I made a few small changes to the database, and reran it and it simply stopped work.

My goal here is to join master_followups with followups_fb_messages.message_text but only return a single row for each UID in master_followups with the most RECENT followups_fb_messages.message_text joined to it.

SELECT master_followups.*, 
  followups_fb_messages.message_text, 
  followups_fb_messages.message_time 
FROM
  master_followups 
  LEFT JOIN followups_fb_messages 
    ON master_followups.UID = followups_fb_messages.FID 
    AND followups_fb_messages.message_time = 
      (SELECT
        MAX(followups_fb_messages.message_time) 
        FROM followups_fb_messages 
        WHERE  followups_fb_messages.FID = master_followups.UID
      )

I've been trying to figure out what happened for the last hour.

Instead of returning 100 results as expected, this is returning 340. I checked the database and it shows 100 rows in master_followups and 340 rows in followups_fb_messages.

I had this exact query working fine about an hour ago, then it stopped. Maybe I changed something, but I can't see it.

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If I had a dollar for every time I've heard "it was working but now it's not and I haven't changed anything" :-) –  Preet Sangha Oct 8 '12 at 1:12
1  
It isn't clear what you mean by the most followups_fb_messages.message_text –  Michael Berkowski Oct 8 '12 at 1:12
    
@MichaelBerkowski: It might make sense if it was 'the most recent followups_fb_messages.message_text'. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 1:14
    
@JonathanLeffler , sorry I left out the word. I do want the most recent. –  Ray Suelzer Oct 8 '12 at 1:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's use some TDQD — Test-Driven Query Design.

Time of most recent follow-up message for each ID

SELECT FID, MAX(message_time) AS MostRecent
  FROM followups_fb_messages
 GROUP BY FID

Most Recent Follow-up Message Information for each ID

SELECT a.*
  FROM followups_fb_messages AS a
  JOIN (SELECT FID, MAX(message_time) AS MostRecent
          FROM followups_fb_messages
         GROUP BY FID
       ) AS b ON a.FID = b.FID AND a.message_time = b.MostRecent

Note that this is a regular inner join, not an OUTER join.

Master Follow-up Information and Follow-up Message Information

SELECT m.*, f.message_text
  FROM master_followups AS m
  LEFT JOIN
       (SELECT a.FID, a.message_text
          FROM followups_fb_messages AS a
          JOIN (SELECT FID, MAX(message_time) AS MostRecent
                  FROM followups_fb_messages
                 GROUP BY FID
               ) AS b ON a.FID = b.FID AND a.message_time = b.MostRecent
       ) AS f ON f.FID = m.UID
share|improve this answer
    
The first one returns 100. The rest all 340! –  Ray Suelzer Oct 8 '12 at 1:26
    
So, we can deduce that there are 100 unique FID values in the Followups_fb_messages table. The second query should return 100 rows unless one or more of the FID values has multiple entries with the same maximal message time. Look at the output of the second query, adding ORDER BY a.FID, a.Message_Time. If you see multiple rows for any FID (and you pretty much must do so if you're seeing 340 rows), then the problem is indeed that there are multiple messages with the same maximal time for a given FID. One advantage of TDQD is that you can test each step, and not proceed until it's right. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 1:34
    
Since we don't have a full schema nor documented primary keys, we can't readily work out how to get a single row per FID from query 2. There should be a way, but it isn't obvious at the moment. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 1:36
    
+1 for TDQD. I do this but I didn't know there was a name for it. –  pilotcam Oct 8 '12 at 1:39
1  
@pilotcam: Thanks. AFAIK, I invented the term — here on SO. If you search for 'user:15168 tdqd', you should find 11 answers where I use the term, each of them building up a more or less complex query one step at a time. You get the same list of answers if you drop the user clause (if you just query for TDQD), so no-one else has picked up on it yet, but it's open for anyone to use. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 1:42

Try this one up.

SELECT  a.*, 
        b.*
FROM    master_followups a
        LEFT JOIN followups_fb_messages b
            ON a.UID = b.FID
        LEFT JOIN 
        (
            SELECT  FID, MAX(message_time) maxTime
            FROM    followups_fb_messages
            GROUP BY FID
        ) c ON b.FID = c.FID AND
                b.message_TIME = c.maxTime
share|improve this answer
    
Still returns 340... I'm stumped. –  Ray Suelzer Oct 8 '12 at 1:17
1  
It's worth mentioning that it was probably working for you at first because of how the query optimizer processed the query. When the database changed slightly, so did the processing order. –  pilotcam Oct 8 '12 at 1:18

Presumably, the reason you are getting duplicates is that more than one row has the maximum message time. Here is one way you can fix this:

 SELECT master_followups.*, 
        ffm.message_text, 
        ffm.message_time 
FROM master_followups LEFT JOIN
     (select *, row_number() over (partition by fid order by message_time desc) seqnum
      from followups_fb_messages
     ) ffm 
     ON master_followups.UID = ffm.FID and
        seqnum = 1

This finds the maximum row based on message_time, but only chooses one row if there are duplicates.

share|improve this answer
    
But, the time values are all unique. message_time is datetime2. –  Ray Suelzer Oct 8 '12 at 1:21

What about John's answer slightly modified?

SELECT  a.*, 
        b.*
FROM    master_followups a
    LEFT JOIN followups_fb_messages b
        ON (b.FID = c.FID AND b.message_time = c.maxTime)
    LEFT JOIN 
    (
        SELECT  FID, MAX(message_time) maxTime
        FROM    followups_fb_messages
        GROUP BY FID
    ) c ON a.UID = c.FID
share|improve this answer

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