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I would like to find the fastest way to check if a file exist in standard c++11(or)c++(or)c (I have thousands of files and before doing something on it I need to check if all of them exist). What to write instead of /* SOMETHING */ in the following function ?

inline bool exist(const std::string& name)
{
    /* SOMETHING */
}
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Not sure how checking for existence plays out on the processor vs drive speeds, but I'll bet it's the drive being slow. –  chris Oct 8 '12 at 1:12
    
boost::filesystem seems to use stat(). (Assuming from the documentation.) I don't think you can do much faster for FS calls. The way to make what you're doing fast is "avoid looking at thousands of files." –  millimoose Oct 8 '12 at 1:15
5  
TOCTOU question: how do you know the file isn't unlinked between your exists() check and your "doing something on it"? –  pilcrow Oct 8 '12 at 1:16
1  
@pilcrow Good point, but there's a fairly wide range of applications that don't need that much correctness. E.g. git push probably doesn't bother to make sure you're not touching the working tree after the initial dirty check. –  millimoose Oct 8 '12 at 1:27
2  
'I can't think of a C/C++ implementation that wouldn't have it' -- Windows does not provide a POSIX environment. –  Jim Balter Oct 8 '12 at 1:58

9 Answers 9

up vote 126 down vote accepted

Well I threw together a test program that ran each of these methods 100,000 times, half on files that existed and half on files that didn't.

inline bool exists_test0 (const std::string& name) {
    ifstream f(name.c_str());
    if (f.good()) {
        f.close();
        return true;
    } else {
        f.close();
        return false;
    }   
}

inline bool exists_test1 (const std::string& name) {
    if (FILE *file = fopen(name.c_str(), "r")) {
        fclose(file);
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }   
}

inline bool exists_test2 (const std::string& name) {
    return ( access( name.c_str(), F_OK ) != -1 );
}

inline bool exists_test3 (const std::string& name) {
  struct stat buffer;   
  return (stat (name.c_str(), &buffer) == 0); 
}

Results for total time to run the 100,000 calls averaged over 5 runs,

Method exists_test0 (ifstream): **0.485s**
Method exists_test1 (FILE fopen): **0.302s**
Method exists_test2 (posix access()): **0.202s**
Method exists_test3 (posix stat()): **0.134s**

The stat() function provided the best performance on my system (Linux, compiled with g++), with a standard fopen call being your best bet if you for some reason refuse to use POSIX functions.

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3  
None of the methods above check for existence, but rather accessibility. I don't know of a single standard C or C++ way to check for existence, though. –  IInspectable Sep 9 '13 at 21:32
2  
stat() seems to check for existence. –  el.pescado Nov 7 '13 at 16:57
15  
Anyone using this needs to remember to #include <sys/stat.h> otherwise it tries to use the wrong stat. –  Katianie Feb 4 at 14:41
7  
I imagine for the ifstream method, you don't need f.close() as f goes out of scope at the end of the function. So return f.good() could replace the if block? –  ilent2 Feb 21 at 2:38
    
Why not use const char * instead od string in exists_test1? Then you can use it also in ANSI C programs. –  nosbor Jul 20 at 14:01

It depends on where the files reside. For instance, if they are all supposed to be in the same directory, you can read all the directory entries into a hash table and then check all the names against the hash table. This might be faster on some systems than checking each file individually. The fastest way to check each file individually depends on your system ... if you're writing ANSI C, the fastest way is fopen because it's the only way (a file might exist but not be openable, but you probably really want openable if you need to "do something on it"). C++, POSIX, Windows all offer additional options.

While I'm at it, let me point out some problems with your question. You say that you want the fastest way, and that you have thousands of files, but then you ask for the code for a function to test a single file (and that function is only valid in C++, not C). This contradicts your requirements by making an assumption about the solution ... a case of the XY problem. You also say "in standard c++11(or)c++(or)c" ... which are all different, and this also is inconsistent with your requirement for speed ... the fastest solution would involve tailoring the code to the target system. The inconsistency in the question is highlighted by the fact that you accepted an answer that gives solutions that are system-dependent and are not standard C or C++.

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I use this piece of code, it works OK with me so far. This does not use many fancy features of C++:

bool is_file_exist(const char *fileName)
{
    std::ifstream infile(fileName);
    return infile.good();
}
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Same as suggested by PherricOxide but in C

#include <sys/stat.h>
int exist(char *name)
{
  struct stat   buffer;
  return (stat (name, &buffer) == 0);
}
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.c_str() is a C++ function. I don't know C++ so I posted a C equivalent. –  Ramon La Pietra Jul 29 at 11:01

Remark : in C++14 and as soon as the filesystem TS will be finished and adopted, the solution will be to use:

std::experimental::filesystem::exists("helloworld.txt");

and hopefully in C++17, only:

std::filesystem::exists("helloworld.txt");
// or 
std::exists("helloworld.txt");
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already available in Boost.Filesystem –  TemplateRex Jul 16 at 14:08
inline bool exist(const std::string& name)
{
    ifstream file(name);
    if(!file)            // If the file was not found, then file is 0, i.e. !file=1 or true.
        return false;    // The file was not found.
    else                 // If the file was found, then file is non-0.
        return true;     // The file was found.
}
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3  
If you're really going to do that, just "return (bool)file" rather than using an if/else branch. –  nhaldimann Aug 20 at 22:17

Another 3 options under windows:

1

inline bool exist(const std::string& name)
{
    OFSTRUCT of_struct;
    return OpenFile(name.c_str(), &of_struct, OF_EXIST) != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE && of_struct.nErrCode == 0;
}

2

inline bool exist(const std::string& name)
{
    HANDLE hFile = CreateFile(name.c_str(), GENERIC_READ, 0, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, NULL);
    if (hFile != NULL && hFile != INVALID_HANDLE)
    {
         CloseFile(hFile);
         return true;
    }
    return false;
}

3

inline bool exist(const std::string& name)
{
    return GetFileAttributes(name.c_str()) != INVALID_FILE_ATTRIBUTES;
}
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You may also do bool b = std::ifstream('filename').good();. Without the branch instructions(like if) it must perform faster as it needs to be called thousands of times.

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Although there are several ways to do this the most efficient solution to your problem would probably be to use one of the fstream's predefined method such as good(). With this method you can check whether the file you've specified exist or not.

fstream file("file_name.txt");

if (file.good()) 
{
    std::cout << "file is good." << endl;
}
else 
{
    std::cout << "file isnt good" << endl;
}

I hope you find this useful.

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