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I have a function as below.

private IList<ContactList> getEmptyRow()
{
    var _ContactList = new List<ContactList>();
    _ContactList.Add(new ContactList()
    {
        Email = string.Empty,
        Name = string.Empty
    });

    return _ContactList;
}

I would like to change my class ContactList to

private IList<T> getEmptyRow() {  ..... T.Add(new T()....

Is this possible ? and how ?
Every suggestion will be appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Something like this perhaps?

public interface IPerson
{ 
    string Email {get;set;}
    string Name {get;set;}
}

public class SomeClass
{
    private IList<T> getEmptyRow<T>() where T : IPerson, new()
    {
        var t = new List<T>();
        t.Add(new T()
        {
            Email = string.Empty,
            Name = string.Empty
        });

        return t;
    }
}

You need an interface or base class so you can set the public properties Email and Name and you need the new() constraint so you can use the default constructor.

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This also assumes a parameterless constructor exists for all implementations of IPerson. –  Mike Parkhill Oct 8 '12 at 2:07
    
Isn't possible giving dynamic object to function instead of directly using IPerson in where T : IPerson, new() ? –  Frank Myat Thu Oct 8 '12 at 2:13
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A bit late since you already accepted an answer, but as an alternative, especially if new() isn't an option, you can setup a provider with pre-defined constructor/initialization syntax which should give you some flexibility:

public static class EmptyRowProvider
{
    private static Dictionary<Type, object> TypeCreators = new Dictionary<Type, object>();

    public static void RegisterType<T>(Func<T> emptyTypeCreator)
    {
        TypeCreators.Add(typeof(T), emptyTypeCreator);
    }

    public static IList<T> GetEmptyRow<T>()
    {
        object typeCreatorUntyped;
        if (!TypeCreators.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out typeCreatorUntyped))
            throw new Exception("Type " + typeof(T).FullName + " not registered!");

        Func<T> typeCreator = (Func<T>)typeCreatorUntyped;

        IList<T> emptyRow = new List<T>();
        emptyRow.Add(typeCreator());
        return emptyRow;
    }
}

Somewhere during your application initialization you would register the type and their factory method. Later on, you just make a call by that type which would run that method:

EmptyRowProvider.RegisterType(() => new ContactList() { Email = String.Empty, Name = String.Empty });


var emptyRow = EmptyRowProvider.GetEmptyRow<ContactList>();

Console.WriteLine(emptyRow.Count); //1
Console.WriteLine(emptyRow[0].Email == String.Empty); //true
Console.WriteLine(emptyRow[0].Name == String.Empty); //true

Say if you had a type that you didn't have a parameterless constructor for, or if later on you decided to change the way it's initialized. Say later you have ContactList use a different constructor:

public ContactList(string email, string name, bool isPrivate)
{
    //initialize data here  
}

Then your new code usage might look like:

EmptyRowProvider.RegisterType(() => new ContactList(String.Empty, String.Empty, true));


var emptyRow = EmptyRowProvider.GetEmptyRow<ContactList>();

Console.WriteLine(emptyRow.Count); //1
Console.WriteLine(emptyRow[0].Email == String.Empty); //true
Console.WriteLine(emptyRow[0].Name == String.Empty); //true
Console.WriteLine(emptyRow[0].IsPrivate == true); //true

Or say you push the ContactList creation to a specific factory method:

EmptyRowProvider.RegisterType(() => ContactListFactory.Create(String.Empty, String.Empty));

And finally, you can register multiple different types with different initializations, but achieve the same usage:

EmptyRowProvider.RegisterType(() => new ContactList(String.Empty, String.Empty, true));
EmptyRowProvider.RegisterType(() => new Person("John", "Doe"));
EmptyRowProvider.RegisterType(() => UserProvider.SetupAnonymousUser("myusername", "mypassword", LoginType.Anonymous));

ContactList emptyContactList = EmptyRowProvider.GetEmptyRow<ContactList>();
Person emptyPerson = EmptyRowProvider.GetEmptyRow<Person>();
User emptyUser = EmptyRowProvider.GetEmptyRow<User>();
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Very good answer. I do appreciate your effort. @Chris Sinclair –  Frank Myat Thu Oct 8 '12 at 2:36
    
I love the way how you register multiple different types in your code. –  Frank Myat Thu Oct 8 '12 at 2:45
    
@Frank: You're welcome! Happy coding! –  Chris Sinclair Oct 8 '12 at 3:42
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