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Is it possible to conditionally override a class property with a property method?

If I have this class which I can instantiate by passing in a dict:

def Foo(Object):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        self.__dict__.update(kwargs)

    # pseudo code (this doesn't work)
    if not self.bar:
        @property
        def bar(self):
            return u"I have overridden foo's bar"

And I make this instance and set bar to '' or None:

my_foo = Foo(**{'bar':u''})

and then I call the bar property:

my_foo.bar

and get

u"I have overridden foo's bar"

I would like to have the property method bar returned, instead of the bar value that was passed in when the object was created.

Can I do that somehow? Any help would be awesome.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "have the property method returned"? Are you saying you want my_foo.bar to return the empty string that you passed in, but if you did other_foo = Foo(**{'bar': None}) then you want other_foo.bar to run the property? –  BrenBarn Oct 8 '12 at 2:43
    
Could you please post some sample code and expected results to illustrate your question? It's not clear at all what you are asking for. –  nneonneo Oct 8 '12 at 2:51
    
I've tried to clarify it some more. –  MFB Oct 8 '12 at 3:10
    
I think you'll have to generate the class dynamically. It could be done with __new__. Anyway I think it easier if, inside the property you call a private method, and you override this private method instead of the property. –  Bakuriu Oct 8 '12 at 7:11
    
@Bakuriu Would you be able to show me what you mean in an answer? –  MFB Oct 8 '12 at 22:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To override a property you have to act on the class and not on the instance, because their machinery, on the instance, gets called before __dict__ lookup and you end up with AttributeErrors. Instead you can set a different property on the class.

But to do so you either have to modify your class every time you create an instance(which I bet you do not want), or you have to generate new classes dynamically.

For example:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, val):
        self._val = val
    @property
    def val(self):
        return self._val

class SubType(Foo):
    def __new__(cls, val):
        if val % 2:
            #random condition to change the property
            subtype = type('SubFoo', (SubType,),
                           {'val': property((lambda self: self._val + 1))})
                return object.__new__(subtype)
            else:
                return object.__new__(cls)

And the results are:

>>> d = SubType(3)  #property changed
>>> d.val
4
>>> f = SubType(2)  #same property as super class
>>> f.val
2

I don't like much this kind of hacks. Probably the easier way of doing thing is calling a private method that computes the property value, for example:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, val):
        self._val = val
    def _compute_val(self):
        return self._val
    @property
    def val(self):
        return self._compute_val()

class SubFoo(Foo):
    def _compute_val(self):
        if self._val % 2:
                return self._val + 1
        else:
                return self._val

Which yields the same results as before:

>>> d = SubFoo(3)
>>> d.val
4
>>> f = SubFoo(2)
>>> f.val
2

I believe this trick could be seen as an application of the Template Method design pattern, even though it is applied to properties.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I need to go home and rethink my life. –  MFB Oct 9 '12 at 6:29

Python properties can't be overwritten, as doing so raises an AttributeError. However, you could try storing your override values and then looking them up when the property is executed:

def overridable(of):
    def nf(self):
        if hasattr(self, "_overrides") and of.__name__ in self._overrides:
            return self._overrides[of.__name__]
        return of(self)
    return nf


class Foo(object):
    _overrides = {}

    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        for k, v in kwargs.iteritems():
            try:
                setattr(self, k, v)
            except AttributeError:
                self._overrides[k] = v

    @property
    @overridable
    def bar(self):
        return u'I have overridden foo\'s bar'


my_foo = Foo(bar=3)
print my_foo.bar
share|improve this answer
1  
eugh...that's an insane hack... –  nneonneo Oct 8 '12 at 2:50
    
Just made it slightly nicer with a decorator :) No more import inspect –  Peter Sobot Oct 8 '12 at 2:51
    
"as doing do raises an AttributeError" - this isn't quite the whole story, and it looks like the OP has already noticed that setting self.__dict__['bar'] will work, insofaras not raising the exception. It still doesn't set the attribute in any meaningful sense, because the machinery that calls the property's underlying method triggers earlier than a lookup into the instance __dict__. –  lvc Oct 8 '12 at 2:53
    
@lvc is correct - you can set the __dict__ on the object, but properties (as bound instance methods) aren't looked up in the dict. –  Peter Sobot Oct 8 '12 at 2:57

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