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I need to use recursion to find the number of vowels in a string. So if hello is entered I want it to return 2.

The problem I'm having is going to the next character in the string.

 def recVowelCount(i):
    count = 0
    if i in 'aeiou':
        count +=1
        reVowelCount(i)
    else:
        reVowelCount(i)
        return count
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1  
Why does it need to use recursion? This is not a good use-case for recursion. –  wim Oct 8 '12 at 5:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's one way to do it using recursion :)

def recVowelCount(i, chars_to_find='aeiou'):
    if not chars_to_find:
        return 0
    return i.count(chars_to_find[0]) + recVowelCount(i, chars_to_find[1:])

Now, the problem in your code is that

if i in 'aeiou':

would be asking if 'hello' in 'aeiou':, which isn't very useful. You need to check if i[0] in 'aeiou' where i[0] will be each letter of "hello" each time the function is called recursively

Start with the simple case. What happens if the input string is empty? You'd just return 0 right?

def recVowelCount(i):
    if not i:
        return 0

So we're half done. Now you need to think about what happens in the case the i isn't empty. If the first character is a vowel, we'll count 1 and then pass the rest of the string into the function recursively

def recVowelCount(i):
    if not i:
        return 0
    if i[0] in 'aeiou':
        count = 1
    else:
        count = 0
    return count + recVowelCount(i[1:])

ok.. that can be refactored a little

def recVowelCount(i):
    if not i:
        return 0
    count = 'aeiou'.count(i[0])
    return count + recVowelCount(i[1:])

and finally

def recVowelCount(i):
    if not i:
        return 0
    return 'aeiou'.count(i[0]) + recVowelCount(i[1:])
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1  
Nipped the issue in the bud with if 'hello' in 'aeiou': –  Burhan Khalid Oct 8 '12 at 4:35
def recVowelCount(s):
    ''' Return number of vowels in string s'''
    if len(s) == 0:
        return 0
    letter = s[0]
    if letter in 'aeiou':
        return 1 + recVowelCount(s[1:])
    return recVowelCount(s[1:])


print recVowelCount('hello')

There are 3 basic steps in any recursive program:

  1. base case
  2. you need to progress towards base case
  3. recursive call
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first of all its not clear what argument you are passing def countVowels(my_string): is probably a better way to start

next you need a base case

 if len(my_string) == 1:
    if my_string in "aeiou": return 1
    else:return 0

then you need your recursion

 elif my_string[0] in "aeiou":
     return 1 + countVowels(my_string[1:])
 else:
      return 0 + countVowels(my_string[1:])
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def find_vowels(word=None, count=0):
    if word:
        if word[0] in ('A','E','I','O','U','a','e','i','o','u'):
            count += 1
        return find_vowels(word=word[1:], count=count)
    else:
        return count

find_vowels('python is awesome')

find_vowels function takes two parameters - One is word, which is the actual string to lookup. The other is count, which contains total occurrences of vowels. Initial value for count is set to 0.

If word is empty, function will return count value. This is when word has been completely checked for vowels. if word:

The following block contains the actual logic. The first character is repeatedly checked in word. If it is a vowel, count argument is incremented.

return find_vowels(word=word[1:], count=count) is where the recursion happens. Using word=word[1:] we slice the first character since it has been checked.

Example:

let word ='Python'

This how value of word looks in subsequent calls:

Python - 1st call
ython - 2nd call
thon - 3nd call
hon - 4th call
on - 5th call
n - 6th call
- last call(Empty)

Finally when string is empty, count is returned.

This is called tail recursion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_call

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