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I have a table (myData) with lots of columns and rows, and have another table (myFileNo) single value which means single row, single column, single cell (FileNo),

I wrote an sql query which updates myData by checking myFileNo, and after process ends it changes the value of FileNo.

It does not make much sense to me to keep the single value data in a table, is this the proper way to do it ?

Edit: purpose of FileNo

It acts as an identification number, but not created like a primary key. An example (before, and after):

Before

myData, FileNo
A, NULL
A, NULL
B, NULL
C, NULL
A, NULL
D, NULL
D, NULL

FileNo: 15

After

myData, FileNo
A, 16
A, 16
B, 17
C, 18
A, 16
D, 19
D, 19

FileNo: 19
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2  
Why not? Why handle "single row, single column" any different from other data? –  marc_s Oct 8 '12 at 5:35
2  
what are you using this number for? if it's to generate an ID for use in another table, then you're doing it wrong - you shouldn't be generating ids yourself when the DB can do it for you automatically. –  Marc B Oct 8 '12 at 5:36
1  
it all depend on the purpose of your table 'myFileNo',what is actual need of this –  Buzz Oct 8 '12 at 5:37
    
I have added the purpose of FileNo to the question. Please check. –  HOY Oct 8 '12 at 5:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the case that the fileNo is being referenced by multiple tables and processes then storing it in a table is fine, you could investigate extended properties, but I would keep it in a table.

If you only need it for this table and you only need to be able to identify the maximum value + 1 for the next load, I suggest you just check Max(FileNo) before inserting, providing this does not cause performance issues, based on the size of the table.

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