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I am simply trying to implement my own header file in C. First up, I have a file INC2.h

void diffadd(int b[], int n);
int diffcheck(int m);

Then I make a file INC2.cpp

void diffadd(int b[], int n)
     {
     int i=0;
     for (i=0; i < n; i++)
          {
          b[i]=b[i]+1;
          printf("\n%d",b[i])
           }
      }
 int diffcheck(int m)
     {
      return (m*5);
      }

Then in the main file LETS.cpp

  #include"inc2.h" 
  void main()
      {
       clrscr();
       int a[5]={1,2,3,4,5};
       diffadd(a,5);
       int t=diffcheck(5);
       printf("t=%d",t);
       getch();
       }

Now I compile inc2.cpp. FINE!

Then I compile lets.cpp.

I get the following errors:

Undefined symbol diffcheck(int) in module LETS.cpp

Undefined symbol diffadd(int near*, int) in module LETS.cpp

Interestingly, if I include inc2.cpp in LETS.cpp, IT WORKS.

If I create a separate header file HEAD.h and define all the functions here, IT WORKS.

PLease Explain what is happening here!

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "Then I compile inc2.h. FINE!"? Do you compile a precompiled header? –  EarlGray Oct 8 '12 at 5:50
    
Urgh. Is that really what your code looks like or is it due to the paste into StackOverflow? :x –  Niklas R Oct 8 '12 at 5:56
    
Please include the exact command line you use to invoke the compiler. –  Zeta Oct 8 '12 at 6:01
    
@Zeta- I have used the Turbo C compiler here. –  Peps Oct 8 '12 at 6:04
    
@Joachim Pileborg-- I dont know about this 0%accept rate. But barring one question, I have ticked everytime, someone answered my question. and this I just confirmed by going over them again. –  Peps Oct 8 '12 at 6:06

2 Answers 2

You should look up some tutorials on the internet about program linking.

When you compile a single .c/.cpp file, compilers often do linking work for you and you have a complete executable on its output. But when you have more than one source file, things get complicated: each of the source files (not .h, headers!) is compiled to an intermediate file, object file, which contains a list of symbols (function/variables names/addresses in memory - all that resides in memory and is visible to external files) that the file provides and a separate list of symbols that the file requires. This stage is called compilation itself. Then you have a bunch of object files that can be combined with a special program, linker, into the executable you want - this is called linking a program. The linker gets the lists of required/provided symbols of all files and looks up whether all required symbols can be found in the given set of provided symbols in all object files and then links provided functions to places where they're required.

Header files are just text stubs that are included literally into source files (.c/.cpp), they're not a subject for compilation (with some exceptions).

Thus: compile your inc2.cpp into an object file, compile lets.cpp into another object file and then let the linker combine them into the executable.

share|improve this answer
    
I have in the TURBOC3/SOURCE folder, the object files of LETS and INC2 modules. What more do I do? –  Peps Oct 8 '12 at 6:21
    
@Peps it depends on your compiler. I don't have TurboC available now, so I can't help with the compiler options and such (I've just tried to explain the essence of the C way of making executables). Please read manual to the compiler, search the internet for TurboC tutorials. –  EarlGray Oct 8 '12 at 6:27

When First time I define my own header file I also got the same error. Then I define a header file with definition of function and that worked for me.

You just need to do is. Define header file like

//inc2.h
void diffadd(int b[], int n)
 {
 int i=0;
 for (i=0; i < n; i++)
      {
      b[i]=b[i]+1;
      printf("\n%d",b[i])
       }
  }

int diffcheck(int m) { return (m*5); }

After that call the funciton in main file like

//Lets.cpp
#include"inc2.h" 
void main()
  {
   clrscr();
   int a[5]={1,2,3,4,5};
   diffadd(a,5);
   int t=diffcheck(5);
   printf("t=%d",t);
   getch();
   }

It might work for you too.

Either you can also write your header file like name #include"inc2.pp" That will also work.

share|improve this answer
    
I already have mentioned....that defining functions in the header file worked perfectly fine. –  Peps Oct 8 '12 at 7:53

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