Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have created an alias for catching up my tracking branches as needed. Here's the current line from the [alias] section of my .gitconfig:

catchup = !CURRENTBRANCH=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD) && echo Currently on $CURRENTBRANCH - switching to $1 && git checkout $1 && git merge origin/$1 && echo Going back to $CURRENTBRANCH && git checkout "$CURRENTBRANCH"

I use it as follows (for example):

git catchup new_design

This code results in (for example):

Currently on integration
Switched to branch 'new_design'
Your branch is behind 'origin/new_design' by 1 commit, and can be fast-forwarded.
Updating c82f7db..51eea8a
Fast-forward
 themes/theme1/css/styles.less | 17 +++++++++++++++++
 themes/theme1/js/app.js       |  6 +++---
 2 files changed, 20 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)
Going back to integration
error: pathspec 'new_design' did not match any file(s) known to git.

I have tried the last command in the alias both with and without the double-quotes, with the same result.

Anyone know how to resolve that error at the end?

For those who might suggest using git pull, it doesn't resolve my problem, and would require entering my password. This alias is to be used if I have recently used git fetch, and have no need to go back to the remote repo.

I am running git bash on Windows 7, fyi.

share|improve this question
    
Even though it should already be the case, try: 1/ adding a git fetch as the first command, 2/ git checkout -t $1 origin/$1 when firs t switching. –  VonC Oct 8 '12 at 6:15
    
Are you saying this is the cause of the error? The idea is to only use this on pre-existing tracking branches. I tried it anyway - it gave fatal: Missing branch name; try -b, and then if I use git checkout -t origin/$1 (which looks more correct) I get fatal: a branch named 'new_design' already exists –  mwotton Oct 8 '12 at 6:22
1  
Can you add a git branch -a before the last git checkout? (to check on which branch git think you are after the merge) –  VonC Oct 8 '12 at 6:33
2  
Could it be that git automatically appends the parameter (here new_design in git catchup new_design) to the end of the command string when executing it? This would mean that the last command is actually git checkout integration new_design, and this gives this error message. –  Philipp Wendler Oct 8 '12 at 9:09
    
@VonC: git symbolic-ref --short HEAD would be a more concise output, but yes, I have tried this and confirmed that I am on the expected branch at that point. –  mwotton Oct 9 '12 at 0:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a shell function for the alias:

[alias]

catchup = "!f() { CURRENTBRANCH=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD) && .... ;}; f"

There the handling of $n works as expected.


The OP mwotton confirms in the comments that the following works:

catchup = "!_(){ CURRENTBRANCH=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD) ; echo \"Currently on \"$CURRENTBRANCH\" - switching to \"$@ ; git checkout $@ ; git merge origin/$@ ; echo \"Going back to \"$CURRENTBRANCH ; git checkout $CURRENTBRANCH; }; _"

In multi-line, for more visibility:

catchup = "!_(){ 
  CURRENTBRANCH=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD) ; 
  echo \"Currently on \"$CURRENTBRANCH\" - switching to \"$@ ; 
  git checkout $@ ; 
  git merge origin/$@ ; 
  echo \"Going back to \"$CURRENTBRANCH ; 
  git checkout $CURRENTBRANCH; }; _"
share|improve this answer
    
This is going to require more skills in shell scripting for bash than I currently have. A quick try gives: f: -c: line 0: syntax error near unexpected token `{CURRENTBRANCH=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD)' f: -c: line 0: `f(){CURRENT BRANCH=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD) ; echo Currently on $CURRENTBRANCH - switching to $1 ; git checkout $1 ; git merge origin/$1 ; echo Going back to $CURRENTBRANCH ; git checkout $CURRENTBRANCH)}; f "$@"' –  mwotton Oct 9 '12 at 0:29
    
Nevermind, I got my skills up to scratch. I ended up with this: catchup = "!_(){ CURRENTBRANCH=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD) ; echo \"Currently on \"$CURRENTBRANCH\" - switching to \"$@ ; git checkout $@ ; git merge origin/$@ ; echo \"Going back to \"$CURRENTBRANCH ; git checkout $CURRENTBRANCH; }; _" –  mwotton Oct 9 '12 at 0:53
    
@mwotton good feedback, and +1 to Stefan. I took the liberty to include your conclusion in Stefan's answer for more visibility. –  VonC Oct 9 '12 at 5:35
    
Where can I get some documentation on things like '$@' and '@-1' - no idea what those are? –  Mark Gibaud Mar 20 '13 at 13:50
    
@MarkGibaud I used tldp.org/LDP/abs/html to learn bash scripting. Before I embarked upon this endeavour, I had no real bash scripting experience. This guide got me through, but you will need to be patient. –  mwotton Apr 22 '13 at 16:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.