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For non-high-performance locking... just robust thread-safe code... I want the simplicity of the lock (obj) { code; } construct, but I want to log before and after it (so that I can easily see deadlocks in the field by getting the log from the user) and I want to support ReaderWriterLocks. (Yes, I realize that Monitor and SpinLock and such are faster... but this is not high-performance high-number-of-threads... the speed is not an issue here.)

I have seen suggestions of doing this via using (new ReadLock(myLock)) { code; }, but the coding of the class being new'd there was often suspect.

Sooo, here's what I came up with. My questions for you all: (1) Any issues with the following code, when used as I indicate in the comments? (2) Any suggestions on how to improve this code to make it more reliable, simpler, or more efficient?

Note that the TccLog is just our own wrapper around log4net... but it could be whatever your chosen log library is.

// Locks.cs == structs intended to be used with using statements for reliable, easy-to-code, logged locks
using System;
using System.Threading;
namespace Tcc.Common
{
/// <summary>
/// A ReadLock allows any number of readers but prevents any writers until the ReadLock is disposed.
/// ReadLocks do NOT log as they can't cause deadlocks without some other thread having a WriteLock.
/// Use a ReadLock with the following syntax:
/// 
/// using (new ReadLock(someReaderWriterLock, timeoutInMS))
/// { code; }
/// 
/// which is equivalent to:
/// 
/// someReaderWriterLock.AcquireReaderLock(timeoutInMS);
/// try
/// { code; }
/// finally
/// { someReaderWriterLock.ReleaseReaderLock(); }
/// </summary>
public struct ReadLock : IDisposable
{
    ReaderWriterLock TheLock;

    public ReadLock(ReaderWriterLock theLock)
    {
        TheLock = theLock;
        TheLock.AcquireReaderLock(100000);
    }

    public ReadLock(ReaderWriterLock theLock, int timeoutMS)
    {
        TheLock = theLock;
        TheLock.AcquireReaderLock(timeoutMS);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        TheLock.ReleaseReaderLock();
    }
}


/// <summary>
/// A WriteLock allows only that one writer and no readers.
/// WriteLocks will log when they start waiting for the lock and again when they release the lock.
/// You may want to log.TraceLock("LOCKED") in the first line of your code that you have acquired the lock.
/// Use a WriteLock with the following syntax:
/// 
/// using (new WriteLock(someReaderWriterLock, timeoutInMS))
/// { code; }
/// 
/// which is equivalent to:
/// 
/// LOG.TraceLock("LOCKING");
/// someReaderWriterLock.AcquireWriterLock(timeoutInMS);
/// try
/// { code; }
/// finally
/// { someReaderWriterLock.ReleaseWriterLock(); LOG.TraceLock("UNLOCKED"); }
/// </summary>
public struct WriteLock : IDisposable
{
    private static TccLog LOG = new TccLog(2);

    ReaderWriterLock TheLock;

    public WriteLock(ReaderWriterLock theLock)
    {
        TheLock = theLock;
        LOG.TraceLock("LOCKING");
        TheLock.AcquireWriterLock(100000);
    }

    public WriteLock(ReaderWriterLock theLock, int timeoutMS)
    {
        TheLock = theLock;
        LOG.TraceLock("LOCKING");
        TheLock.AcquireWriterLock(timeoutMS);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        TheLock.ReleaseWriterLock();
        LOG.TraceLock("UNLOCKED");
    }
}


/// <summary>
/// A FullLock is like the built-in 'lock' (Monitor on any heap object), except it implements logging.
/// FullLocks will log when they start waiting for the lock and again when they release the lock.
/// You may want to log.TraceLock("LOCKED") in the first line of your code that you have acquired the lock.
/// Use a FullLock with the following syntax:
/// 
/// using (new FullLock(someHeapObject))
/// { code; }
/// 
/// which is equivalent to:
/// 
/// LOG.TraceLock("LOCKING");
/// lock (someHeapObject)
/// { code; }
/// LOG.TraceLock("UNLOCKED");
/// </summary>
public struct FullLock : IDisposable
{
    private static TccLog LOG = new TccLog(2);

    object TheLock;

    public FullLock(object theLock)
    {
        TheLock = theLock;
        LOG.TraceLock("LOCKING");
        Monitor.Enter(TheLock);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Monitor.Exit(TheLock);
        LOG.TraceLock("UNLOCKED");
    }
}


/// <summary>
/// A NamedLock is like the built-in 'lock' (Monitor on any heap object), except it implements logging.
/// NamedLocks will log when they start waiting for the lock and again when they release the lock.
/// You may want to log.TraceLock("LOCKED") in the first line of your code that you have acquired the lock.
/// Use a NamedLock with the following syntax:
/// 
/// using (new NamedLock(someHeapObject, "name"))
/// { code; }
/// 
/// which is equivalent to:
/// 
/// LOG.TraceLock("LOCKING name");
/// lock (someHeapObject)
/// { code; }
/// LOG.TraceLock("UNLOCKED name");
/// </summary>
public struct NamedLock : IDisposable
{
    private static TccLog LOG = new TccLog(2);

    object TheLock;
    string Name;

    public NamedLock(object theLock, string name)
    {
        Name = name;
        TheLock = theLock;
        LOG.TraceLock("LOCKING " + name);
        Monitor.Enter(TheLock);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Monitor.Exit(TheLock);
        LOG.TraceLock("UNLOCKED " + Name);
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Need code review? Try codereview.stackexchange.com –  Lirik Oct 8 '12 at 5:58
    
You may be correct about read locks, by themselves, being incapable of producing deadlocks, but they may be part of a lock cycle - you'll have incomplete information to construct the entire graph. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 8 '12 at 6:03
    
As a general comment, change to a ReaderWriterLockSlim. –  Michael Oct 8 '12 at 6:09
    
Damien, you are correct... however, I will at least know which lock because I'll see a LOCKING with no UNLOCKED on any writers. Then I can check each of the other threads to see if any of their final log statements indicate that they were in a read, or likely waiting for a read. Ideally, we'd have the logging on the readers as well... but that can end up generating an excessive amount of logging. Its a trade-off in practice. –  Brian Kennedy Oct 9 '12 at 0:46
    
Yes, once we move from .NET 2.0 to .NET 3.5, then we will move to ReaderWriterLockSlim. We haven't made that move yet due to bugs in VS 2010 that cause it to not convert our VS 2005 projects properly... ClickOnce deployment gets broken. But yes, that's the better class to use. –  Brian Kennedy Oct 9 '12 at 0:49

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