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I have this module, wat.py

import re
import types
import sys

hello = "Hello World"

class MyModule(types.ModuleType):
    def get_re(self):
        return re
    def get_hello(self):
        return hello


sys.modules[__name__] = MyModule('wat')

And I run this code:

>>> import wat
>>> wat.get_hello()
None
>>> wat.get_re()
None

Why does this not work?

share|improve this question
    
If I were you, I would start with a more general python tutorial... (docs.python.org/tutorial/modules.html#packages) –  gecco Oct 8 '12 at 8:49
    
@gecco: I'm not new to python. I'm trying to make a module callable, but the imports are going awry. –  Eric Oct 8 '12 at 8:50
    
ok, sorry, I got something wrong... –  gecco Oct 8 '12 at 8:52
    
1  
If you set a breakpoint with import pdb; pdb.set_trace() in the get_hello() method and inspect the locals and globals, you'll notice that hello is None (it's defined though). I'm not exactly sure why this is happening, but that seems to be the root cause of your problem. –  Lukas Graf Oct 8 '12 at 8:58
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It doesn't work because you effectively deleted your module when you reassigned its entry in sys.modules. See my related question.

To make it work, change the last line of your module to:

_ref, sys.modules[__name__] = sys.modules[__name__], MyModule('wat')

and it will work.

BTW, you don't have to derive your class from types.ModuleType in order to put instances of it in sys.modules[]. Entries in sys.modules don't have to be module objects (according to Alex Martelli).

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like the right answer - I'll check it tomorrow. –  Eric Oct 8 '12 at 17:57
    
"you don't have to derive your class from types.ModuleType" - true, but I see no reason not to. –  Eric Oct 9 '12 at 8:10
    
@Eric: Depends on what your class is or does, as in is it a type (or subclass) of a module, or is it something else altogether. –  martineau Oct 9 '12 at 10:07
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This code makes it work:

import types
import sys

def whyDoesThisWorkIDontEven():
    import re
    hello = "Hello World"

    class MyModule(types.ModuleType):
        def get_re(self):
            return re
        def get_hello(self):
            return hello

    return MyModule('wat')

sys.modules[__name__] = whyDoesThisWorkIDontEven()

But I have absolutely no idea why.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this makes it work because Python sets all the variables to None in a module when it's deleted as stated in the accepted answer to the linked question in my answer. Actually it would be more accurately to say it (only) sets all the top-level module attributes in its __dict__ to None -- so what you've done here effectively protects things by moving them down a level to inside the function. This makes it work but doesn't answer the question. –  martineau Oct 8 '12 at 22:31
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Not sure what you mean by "doesn't play well with imports" as this seems to work also. Not sure if thats what you want but maybe it's useful...

    import sys
    import re
    class _Test(object):
      def __init__(self):
          self.re=re
      def testfunc(self):
          return self.re
      y = property(testfunc)
    sys.modules[__name__] = _Test()

import calltest

>>> calltest.y
<module 're' from 'C:\Python26\lib\re.pyc'>
>>> calltest.re
<module 're' from 'C:\Python26\lib\re.pyc'>
>>> calltest.testfunc()
<module 're' from 'C:\Python26\lib\re.pyc'>

EDIT:

If you simply try to return re you will get None. You have to import re after you do

sys.modules[__name__] = _Test()

like:

sys.modules[__name__] = _Test()
import re

then simply calling re woudld work.

share|improve this answer
    
Have an upvote for a working solution. But why is re in scope in __init__, but not in testfunc? –  Eric Oct 8 '12 at 9:26
    
@ Eric -- updated my answer. –  root Oct 8 '12 at 9:45
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