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I thought I have understood the idee of closures, but the following code behaves surprisingly for me:

function A(x)
{
  this.getX1 = function () { return x; }
  A.prototype.getX2 = function () { return x; }
}
var a1 = new A(1);
var a2 = new A(2);
console.log ('a1.getX1()=%d', a1.getX1 ()); // 1
console.log ('a2.getX1()=%d', a2.getX1 ()); // 2
console.log ('a1.getX2()=%d', a1.getX2 ()); // 2 ???
console.log ('a2.getX2()=%d', a2.getX2 ()); // 2

I could understand if prototype methods behave differently from instance methods, but this looks like x has become a static variable. Changing the order of calls does not change results.

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4 Answers 4

When you change the prototype you're changing the function for all instances of the given class, including those that already exist.

Therefore when you call...

A.prototype.getX2 = function () { return x; }

You're setting that for the existing a1 instance of A. So effectively you're ending up with the following pseudo code:

<all instances of A>.getX2 = function () {
    return <latest value of x passed to A constructor>;
}
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The static member here is A.prototype.getX2. The second call to A.prototype.getX2 = function () { return x; } (due to var a2 = new A(2);) replaces the first one. To understand it you can reverse the order of instantiations:

var a2 = new A(2);
var a1 = new A(1);

Then you'll have:

a1.getX1()=1
a2.getX1()=2
a1.getX2()=1
a2.getX2()=1
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You're defining getX2 twice, each time you create a new A. The result for that function will always be the last X. Considering rewriting your code like this:

function A(x) {

    this.x = x;
    this.getX1 = function() {
        return this.x;
    }
}
A.prototype.getX2 = function() {
    return this.x;
}
var a1 = new A(1);
var a2 = new A(2);
console.log('a1.getX1()=%d', a1.getX1()); // 1
console.log('a2.getX1()=%d', a2.getX1()); // 2
console.log('a1.getX2()=%d', a1.getX2()); // 1
console.log('a2.getX2()=%d', a2.getX2()); // 2​​​ 

This way, you only define getX2 once and it works as expected.

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Thank you. That made things clear to me. –  user1728219 Oct 8 '12 at 9:05
    
You're welcome :) –  Peeter Oct 8 '12 at 10:44

You have written

function A(x)
{
  this.getX1 = function () { return x; }
  A.prototype.getX2 = function () { return x; }
}

This constructor overwrites A.prototype.getX2 each time.

So first

var a1 = new A(1); // This invokes A and adds a function `getX2` to the prototype of `A`which returns `x` that is `1`

var a2 = new A(2); // This invokes A and overwrites the function `getX2` in the prototype of `A` with a function which returns `x` that is `2` now.

So it should be like this

function A(x)
{
  this.getX1 = function () { return x; }
}

A.prototype.getX2 = function () { return this.getX1(); }
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