Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does compiling this code:

triples( [], _,_,_)->
  [];

triples( Self, X, Y, none )->
  [ Result || Result = { X, Y, _} <- Self ].

report:

./simple_graph.erl:63: Warning: variable 'X' is unused
./simple_graph.erl:63: Warning: variable 'Y' is unused
./simple_graph.erl:64: Warning: variable 'X' is unused
./simple_graph.erl:64: Warning: variable 'X' shadowed in generate
./simple_graph.erl:64: Warning: variable 'Y' is unused
./simple_graph.erl:64: Warning: variable 'Y' shadowed in generate

And return wrong result: full Self.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 44 down vote accepted

This is because variables occurring on the LHS of generators, X and Y here, are always new unbound variables local to the comprehension. This means that they are not the same variables as the X and Y in the head of triples and, therefore, there is no implicit equality test. This similar to funs where all variables occurring in the head of a fun are alse new variables local to the fun.

This is different from most of the rest of erlang, which is why the compiler not only warns that the X and Y in the head are not used but also that the X and Y in the comprehension shadow the other variables. They are also unused anywhere in the comprehension.

An easy way to get what you want is:

[ Result || Result = {X1,Y1,_} <- Self, X =:= X1, Y =:= Y1 ]
share|improve this answer
4  
Wow. This is a gotcha! –  Christian Aug 15 '09 at 10:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.