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I'm using the function popen2 (that has been recommended elsewhere on stackoverflow) to programatically create a process that has to be killed again after some time. popen2 returns a PID and I thought that this PID could be used to kill the process. It doesn't work this way, though. In order to kill it, I have to increment the returned PID, which I don't understand (see code below)

Another problem might arise when various threads are doing this in parallel. In that case the PIDs might differ by more than one due to race conditions, I think.

So my question is this: How can I reliably identify the PID of the process created by popen2 in a multi-threaded scenario?

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>

#define READ 0
#define WRITE 1

pid_t popen2(const char *command, int *infp, int *outfp) {

    int p_stdin[2], p_stdout[2];
    pid_t pid;

    if (pipe(p_stdin) != 0 || pipe(p_stdout) != 0)
        return -1;

    pid = fork();

    if (pid < 0)
        return pid;
    else if (pid == 0)
    {
        close(p_stdin[WRITE]);
        dup2(p_stdin[READ], READ);
        close(p_stdout[READ]);
        dup2(p_stdout[WRITE], WRITE);

        execl("/bin/sh", "sh", "-c", command, NULL);
        perror("execl");
        exit(1);
    }

    if (infp == NULL)
        close(p_stdin[WRITE]);
    else
        *infp = p_stdin[WRITE];

    if (outfp == NULL)
        close(p_stdout[READ]);
    else
        *outfp = p_stdout[READ];

    return pid;
}

main() {
    pid_t pid;

    // Create process
    pid = popen2("crafty", &in, &out);

    sleep(5);

    // Why doesn't kill(pid, SIGKILL) work?
    kill(pid+1, SIGKILL);

    while (1); 
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you sure that popen2 actually returns a valid pid? It can return -1 to indicate an error. If you call kill on -1 you attempt a system wide kill which may or may not do any good, on the contrary a kill on 0 will kill your process group: your process and it's children. –  Sergey L. Oct 8 '12 at 9:26
    
Yes, I'm positively sure the returned PID is valid. –  chessweb Oct 8 '12 at 9:34
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think I got it.

execl("/bin/sh", "sh", "-c", command, NULL);

runs sh and popen2 returns it's pid. When you call kill it kills sh, but does not touch it's child process command. It is actually a fluke that killing the next pid kills command. This will not always work and is just up to race conditions.

If you want to be able to kill your target process then you will have to start that directly.

Warning (untested code):

pid_t popen2(const char **command, int *infp, int *outfp) {

    int p_stdin[2], p_stdout[2];
    pid_t pid;

    if (pipe(p_stdin) != 0 || pipe(p_stdout) != 0)
        return -1;

    pid = fork();

    if (pid < 0)
        return pid;
    else if (pid == 0)
    {
        close(p_stdin[WRITE]);
        dup2(p_stdin[READ], READ);
        close(p_stdout[READ]);
        dup2(p_stdout[WRITE], WRITE);

        execvp(*command, command);
        perror("execvp");
        exit(1);
    }

    if (infp == NULL)
        close(p_stdin[WRITE]);
    else
        *infp = p_stdin[WRITE];

    if (outfp == NULL)
        close(p_stdout[READ]);
    else
        *outfp = p_stdout[READ];

    return pid;
}

and pass command in the form of

char *command[] = {"program", "arg1", "arg2", ..., NULL};

in your particular example:

char *command[] = {"crafty", NULL};
share|improve this answer
    
That helps somewhat. It works as intended, but when I kill the process with the returned PID and do a ps aux | grep crafty on the shell, I see that the process is still running. It is <defunct>, however. It doesn't disappear until the program itself is terminated. –  chessweb Oct 8 '12 at 10:53
2  
That is because a dead process needs to be collected/cleaned up by it's parent. When a child process dies it becomes a zombie, ps will mark it Z and <defunct>. A dying process sends a SIGCHLD signal to it's parent and can be collected with the wait family of system calls. Shells do that automatically, user programs do not. A simple solution is to just call wait(0); after killing (caution: will wait forever if the child does not die for whatever reason). Read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zombie_process for more information about zombie processes. –  Sergey L. Oct 8 '12 at 11:15
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You can use 'exec' command of shell to avoid pending process. Also: popen2 shall close the writing end of unused pipes, otherwise the pipe remains open. If one of pointers (infp, outpf) is NULL, it is useless to create and immediately close the pipe. Here is the version of popen2 I use in my project:

pid_t popen2(char *command, int *in_fd, int *out_fd) {
    int     pin[2], pout[2];
    pid_t   pid;
    char    cmd[strlen(command)+10];

    if (out_fd != NULL) {
        if (pipe(pin) != 0) return(-1);
    }
    if (in_fd != NULL) {
        if (pipe(pout) != 0) {
            if (out_fd != NULL) {
                close(pin[0]);
                close(pin[1]);
            }
            return(-1);
        }
    }

    pid = fork();

    if (pid < 0) {
        if (out_fd != NULL) {
            close(pin[0]);
            close(pin[1]);
        }
        if (in_fd != NULL) {
            close(pout[0]);
            close(pout[1]);
        }
        return pid;
    }
    if (pid==0) {
        if (out_fd != NULL) {
            close(pin[1]);
            dup2(pin[0], 0);
        }
        if (in_fd != NULL) {
            close(pout[0]);
            dup2(pout[1], 1);
        }
        // Exec makes possible to kill this process 
        sprintf(cmd, "exec %s", command);
        execlp("sh", "sh", "-c", cmd, NULL);
        fprintf(stderr, "%s:%d: Exec failed in popen2. ", __FILE__, __LINE__);
        perror("Error:");
        exit(1);
    }
    if (in_fd != NULL) {
        close(pout[1]);
        *in_fd = pout[0];
    }
    if (out_fd != NULL) {
        close(pin[0]);
        *out_fd = pin[1];
    }
    return pid;
}
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