Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Background: I have a custom HTTP server written in Erlang to stream stuff to an iPad app. I was using NSURLConnection - the standard high-level Apple way to consume HTTP content. However I was having problems with small chunks of data being buffered and not passed to my code immediately, so I was forced to switch to CFNetwork.

While NSURLConnection never complained, CFNetwork sometimes (~1 in 3 times) gives the following error and kills the connection:

The operation couldn’t be completed. (kCFErrorDomainCFNetwork error 303.)

According to Apple docs, this corresponds to "The HTTP server response could not be parsed."

This only occurs after the connection has been opened for a couple of seconds, and the response is being made.

I've taken a packet capture on the server with tshark. It's quite large, and contains UTF-8 as well as confidential details.

How can I go about verifying that it's a valid HTTP 1.1 chunked response?

Just to clarify, I've looked through the result of tcpick -C -yP -r ... and couldn't see anything immediately amiss, but I'm wondering if there's anything I can pass it through to confirm it's byte for byte valid.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out it was sndbuf in the Erlang web server being set too low that was the problem.

That was a 5 hour waste of scanning a packet capture, implementing chunked HTTP with CFStream from scratch, etc, etc

share|improve this answer
add comment

How can I go about verifying that it's a valid HTTP 1.1 chunked response?

By confirming wheter chunked transfer encoding is implemented correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Care to elaborate? As far as I can tell the implementation is sound, as far as I can tell the packet dump is sound (although it's rather large so my looking was somewhat superficial), but CFNetwork's telling me it's not sound. Short of me writing an HTTP client to consume the packet capture to verify it, is there anything I can do to validate it? –  Alec Oct 8 '12 at 10:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.