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Why x_temp is not updating the value, where as the commented line x &= ~(1 << i); is working perfectly. Where it is going wrong?

int x = 0x4567;
int x_temp = 0x0;// = 0xF0FF;
int y = 0x0200;
int i;
for(i = 8; i < 12; i++)
{//clean clear
    x_temp = x & ~(1 << i);
    //x &= ~(1 << i); //This line works perfectly.
}
printf("x_temp = %x....\n", x_temp);//Still it retains the value 0x4567.
printf("x = %x....\n", x);
y = x|y; //y = x_temp|y;
printf("y = %x\n", y);
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the last iteration of your loop, i is 11, but the 11th bit of x is already 0, so the result is 0x4567. I don't know why you expect something else. In the case of x &= ~(1 << i), you clear a bit in the previous value of x, whereas with x_temp you keep assigning a fresh value to x_temp ... one case is cumulative, the other is not.

Consider a trace of the two loops:

for `x &= ~(1 << i)`, you have
x is 0x4567 originally
x is 0x4467 after clearing 1<<8
x is 0x4467 after clearing 1<<9
x is 0x4067 after clearing 1<<10
x is 0x4067 after clearing 1<<11

but

for `x_temp = x & ~(1 << i)`, you have
x is 0x4567 (originally and forever)
x_temp is 0x4467 after clearing 1<<8 from x (which hasn't changed)
x_temp is 0x4567 after clearing 1<<9 from x (which hasn't changed)
x_temp is 0x4167 after clearing 1<<10 from x (which hasn't changed)
x_temp is 0x4567, after clearing 1<<11 from x (which hasn't changed)

Maybe this is clearer: Suppose x = 5; then a loop that sets x += 1 will yield values of 6,7,8,9,10, ... but a loop that sets x_temp = x + 1 will yield values of 6,6,6,6,6,...

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When I am doing x &= ~(1 << 11); the x value changes from 0x4567 to 0x4067. But the same does not happen with x_temp = x & ~(1 << 11); –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Oct 8 '12 at 9:53
    
@RasmiRanjanNayak Yes, because in one case you change x and in the other case you don't. So when you clear the next bit in x, in one case you're using the modified value of x and in the other case you're using the original value. –  Jim Balter Oct 8 '12 at 9:56
    
Yes Yes, Now I got it. Ya my doubt got claered... Really good explanation, You guys are amazing.. –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Oct 8 '12 at 10:14

Maybe it's because you're discarding the old values of x_temp?

for(i = 8; i < 12; i++)
{
    x_temp = x & ~(1 << i);
}

is the same as

x_temp = x & ~(1 << 11);
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If that is the case then how x &= ~(1 << i) works? –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Oct 8 '12 at 9:50
    
@RasmiRanjanNayak Because you keep changing x, so the changes are cumulative. You need to think this through a bit more, because it really is obvious to Zeta and me, and probably many others. –  Jim Balter Oct 8 '12 at 9:52
    
@RasmiRanjanNayak: x &= v is the same as x = x & v. The value of x changes in each iteration. However, x_temp isn't on the right side of the assignment, so its value is irrelevant to the result. –  Zeta Oct 8 '12 at 9:53
    
@Zeta: If i understood corretly, you mean to say; if, x += 5;//int x = 1 then x = 6 //Output same above code if y = x + 5; then value of y = 5 not 6. Is it? –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Oct 8 '12 at 9:55
    
@RasmiRanjanNayak: No. If x == 1, what's the value of the expression x + 5? Well, it's 1 + 5, and y will be 6. –  Zeta Oct 8 '12 at 10:00

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