Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi guys!

I have a small problem, i can't verbally explain the problem, so i'll just try to illustrate it in code:

class move(object):
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.number = number

list1 = [move(1), move(2), move(3), move(4)]
list2 = [move(3), move(7)]

list1.remove(list2[0])

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#6>", line 1, in <module>
    list1.remove(list2[0])
ValueError: list.remove(x): x not in list

As you can see, list1[2] and list2[0] are both derived from the same class and have the exact same attributes, they are only two different instances of this class

What is the optimal solution to this problem?

Thank you very much for your help!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should override the __eq__ of your class to tell Python that two classes are equal if their numbers are equal:

class move(object):
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.number = number

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.number == other.number
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you and everybody else! I think i'll go with this approach because this seems the most obvious. But is this the quickest approach of the ones given here? I'm making a chess engine and the engine's performance speed is really an issue at the moment. –  geekkid Oct 8 '12 at 9:56

If you care about performance, you can use this case:

class move(int):
    pass # you can add new attrs and methods 


list1 = [move(1), move(2), move(3), move(4)]
list2 = [move(3), move(7)]

list1.remove(list2[0])

print list1 # [1, 2, 4]
share|improve this answer

If your Move data type is going to be immutable, you are better off using namedtuple which are quite terse to define, and you get an equality implementation for free.

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> Move = namedtuple('Move', 'number')
>>> list1 = [Move(2), Move(3), Move(7)]
>>> list2 = [Move(3), Move(7)]
>>> 
>>> list1.remove(list2[0])
>>> list1
[Move(number=2), Move(number=7)]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.