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Inside the init function of an object I'm creating I want to create a new instance of another object.

At the moment my init code looks like this:

    var myObj = {

getData: function(){

      var instance = this;

      // Display preloader gif
      instance.selectors.preloader.fadeIn();

      // Make call for appropriate data */
      dataManager.feed.get( function(data){

        for( var i = 0, len = data.feed.length; i < len; i++ ){

          var template = '';

        }
      }, window, null, '' );

      instance.displayVideos();

    },

    init: function(){

          var instance = this;

          // Create new DataManager object
          var dataManager = new DataManager();
    }



    }

myObj.init();

My problem is that I get an error telling me that DataManager is not defined, can anyone explain how I reference this object?

share|improve this question
2  
But DataManager is undefined in your example. –  alex Oct 8 '12 at 10:09
    
It also looks like you're using Closure and you forgot to include the files necessary, which would explain the DataManager being undefined –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 8 '12 at 11:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look, your code might be salvageable, but it's going to be hellish to maintain. I'd therefore suggest you use a closure, where you can prep your object as much as you want, before finally exposing it:

var myObj = (function(current)
{
    'use strict';//<-- not necessary, but highly recommended
    var instance = {};//<-- this is going to become the value myObj references
    //if you want the init method, make a function object
    var init = function()
    {
        instance.dataManager = new DataManager();
    };
    instance.init = init;//<-- make it "public"
    //alternatively:
    instance.dataManager = new DataManager();
    //OR to have access to an instance of the DataManager object, but as a 
    // "private" property:
    var dataManager = new DataManager();
    //All methods or functions declared in this scope will have access to this object, 
    // the outer scope won't!
    //same for getData, use either one of the following:
    var getData = function()
    {
        //refer to the instance, not by using this, but use instance var
        //which is safer, and immutable thanks to the closure we're building
    };
    instance.getData = getData;
    //OR:
    instance.getData = function()
    {
        //same function body, just created and assigned directly
    };
    //if you chose to use the init method:
    instance.init();
    //if you created an init function, but didn't assign it to the instance object:
    init();
    //when the instance object is all set up and good to go:
    return instance;//will be assigned to the myObj variable
}(this));//call function and pass current scope as argument

Then, there's just this piece of code that I really don't get:

dataManager.feed.get( function(data)
{
    //...
    for( var i = 0, len = data.feed.length; i < len; i++ )
    {//loop through an array of sorts
         var template = '';//and initialize a variable to an empty string each time?
    }
}, window, null, '' );

Why? What's the point, or is this just a dummy loop?


The way I see it, there are 2 major issues here. The first being you failed to include the DataManager constructor function. Assuming that constructor is defined in your code:

var myObj = {
    init: function()
    {
        var instance = this;
        // Create new DataManager object
        var dataManager = new DataManager();
    },
    myObj.init();//<== this can't work
};

You're calling a method of an object literal while you're still defining it. That doesn't work:

var myObj = {
    init: function()
    {
        var instance = this;
        // Create new DataManager object
        var dataManager = new DataManager();
    }
};
myObj.init();//<== now myObj exists, and has an init method
share|improve this answer
    
sorry that was actually a typo, i have the init method outside of myObj –  styler Oct 8 '12 at 10:18
    
In that case, is the DataManager constructor defined, and how is it defined? Do the cases match (remember that JS is Case Sensitive). If you defined it like so: var DataManager = function(){} your constructor is nameless, and merely referenced by the var DataManager, which complicates things. Therefore it would be better to include the constructor, too –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 8 '12 at 10:28
    
Correct, but since functions are first class objects in js, you can pass it to the init method even if you have just a reference. Or you could scope it so it is globally available, but polluting the global space is bad. –  Asad Oct 8 '12 at 10:34
    
@Asad: Those aren't the complications I was on about... The main thing is myObj = {some:'literal',with: new Foo();}; var Foo = function(){this.instName = 'Foo';}; isn't going to work, because the constructor is defined in an expression, and isn't lifted to the top of the scope. Whereas function Foo(){} is lifted to the top –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 8 '12 at 10:38
    
So if he defined window.DataManager=function(){etc... return a datamanager object}, then initialised object with myObj.init(DataManager), assuming he had set a parameter, it wouldn't work? –  Asad Oct 8 '12 at 10:44

DataManager object should be defined before calling init() method. I see one more problem within your code (). dataManager variable is not declared/assigned within getData() function. Use object level variable in this case. Try this : inside init method -

init: function(){

      var instance = this;

      // Create new DataManager object
      this.dataManager = new DataManager();  }

and inside getData() method use

this.dataManager

instead of

dataManager

.

share|improve this answer
    
Pankaj, in the question he is stating that the problem is DataManager is undefined, not dataManager, although you are probably right about his intention being to use the same dataManager property for all methods of myObj. –  Asad Oct 8 '12 at 10:38
    
Yes Asad, thats right, I have edited the answer, actually I saw other people have answered about DataManager object's definition, so only pointed out other potential problem. –  Pankaj Kumar Oct 8 '12 at 10:55

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