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What does the following code do?

obj *x = new obj[100];
delete x; // Note the omission of []

Does it delete only the first element in the array?

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It would likely delete the entire array but not in the way you'd expect. See my answer for more detail. –  TheBuzzSaw Oct 8 '12 at 16:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Even though it is undefined behavior, you should probably take note of the most likely result (for the sake of debugging such issues).

When you create an array via new Object[100], the memory is first allocated. The default behavior (provided there were no overrides to the default allocator) is to simply call malloc(100 * sizeof(Object)). After that, the constructor for Object needs to be called on each Object-sized region. This is an important detail: the memory is allocated once, but the constructor is called in 100 locations.

When a block is allocated via malloc, it cannot be freed in pieces. Only a call to free(block) will release that memory. The C++ keyword delete internally calls free if the keyword new calls malloc. So, the proper way to delete an array is to call delete [] array. So, what happens if you call delete array? The likely answer is that the memory will be freed (all of it, not just the first element), but only one destructor will be called: the first element's destructor.

Obviously, there are lots of facts to consider. new and delete are not necessarily bound to malloc and free. They may use system calls unique to a specific architecture or operating system. (Windows, in particular, has a whole set of heap management functions outside of malloc and free in its C API.) I simply demonstrated the example with malloc and free because that is what I have seen the most often when stepping through code. Visual Studio, for example, lets you step into new calls and actually see the new function code. (That's another important detail. new and delete are simply function calls, which you can even override in many cases.)


You can demonstrate this concept with this little program. Simply create an Object class that outputs something during the constructor and outputs something else during the destructor.

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Object* o = new Object[4];
    delete o;
    return 0;
}

I ran it, and sure enough: the constructor was called 4 times, and the destructor was called once.

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One would think the correct answer would deserve more upvotes... hmmm. Groupies on the 82k much? –  tubaguy50035 Oct 8 '12 at 16:58
1  
@dasblinkenlight It's not "advice". The question was simple: what happens when you do this? Your response did not answer the question. You simply said, "Don't do that." I agree that no one should ever do this, but it is perfectly reasonable to ask: what would happen in this case? –  TheBuzzSaw Oct 8 '12 at 17:08
2  
@dasblinkenlight You misunderstand. If someone were to accidentally type delete instead of delete [], you should be aware of the behavior in order to track it down. How is your answer helpful at all? The question is about what happens, not whether it is morally acceptable to do so. –  TheBuzzSaw Oct 8 '12 at 17:09
1  
@dasblinkenlight That's the problem here. Everyone agrees about what the C++ standard says. The OP asked a very clear question: what happens when you call delete on a new[]. It did not ask what happens only in accordance with the C++ standard. –  TheBuzzSaw Oct 8 '12 at 17:43
2  
@dasblinkenlight There is absolutely nothing wrong with being curious about what is actually happening, even in areas that are "officially" undefined. TheBuzzSaw never pretended to know what always happens, he simply provided a way to see some of what happens under whatever compiler you happen to be using, and satisfying curiosity is both a good and necessary exercise. The fact is, you did not answer the OP's question, you just told him he should never do that. TheBuzzSaw both pointed out that you shouldn't do it normally, and then answered the question. –  Cdaragorn Oct 8 '12 at 19:11

This code was exhibiting definite behaviour on GCC i.e was deleting first object.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

class myclass {

public:

int i;

myclass(){

std::cout <<"myclass constructed \n";

this->i = rand() % 100;

std::cout<<this->i;
}

~myclass(){

std::cout <<"myclass destroyed\n";

std::cout<<this->i;
}       
};

int main()
{

myclass * pt;

srand ( time(NULL) );   

pt = new myclass[3];

delete pt;

return 0;
}
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The code above exhibits undefined behavior: it should be

delete[] x;

because the allocation was done with new[].

When you use the correct operator, the entire array pointed to by the pointer gets deleted:

obj *x = new obj[100];
delete[] x; // The entire array gets deleted
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2  
As dasblinkenlight said, your code is undefined and the effect will be compiler-dependent. Yes the destructor of obj will be called, but as you do not know how the compiler allocates arrays, you cannot say that e.g. the first element of the array will be destroyed. –  Zane Oct 8 '12 at 10:23
2  
@Vsevywniy As it is always the case with undefined behavior, nobody can say with certainty how your program will fail, or even if it is going to fail at all. Anything could happen, from a crash to a call of destructors on all elements, but there is absolutely no way to give a definitive answer. –  dasblinkenlight Oct 8 '12 at 10:36
1  
@DeadMG In all fairness, the virtues of the RAII concept have nothing whatsoever to do with the OP's question. He's asking what happens if he misleads a compiler that has no way of knowing obj *x = new obj() from obj *x = new obj[100], and the answer is "it's undefined behavior". –  dasblinkenlight Oct 8 '12 at 14:32
1  
@dasblinkenlight It's not useful to know? How does one debug a new[] and delete mismatch without this knowledge? –  TheBuzzSaw Oct 8 '12 at 17:57
1  
OK, folks, this is getting a little out of hand. If you want to keep having this discussion, I suggest moving this to chat and laying off the personal insults. –  Brad Larson Oct 8 '12 at 19:44

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