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Java Regex Replace with Capturing Group

Is there any way to replace a regexp with modified content of capture group?

Example:

Pattern regex = Pattern.compile("(\\d{1,2})");
Matcher regexMatcher = regex.matcher(text);
resultString = regexMatcher.replaceAll("$1"); // *3 ??

And I'd like to replace all occurrence with $1 multiplied by 3.

edit:

Looks like, something's wrong :(

If I use

Pattern regex = Pattern.compile("(\\d{1,2})");
Matcher regexMatcher = regex.matcher("12 54 1 65");
try {
    String resultString = regexMatcher.replaceAll(regexMatcher.group(1));
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

It throws an IllegalStateException: No match found

But

Pattern regex = Pattern.compile("(\\d{1,2})");
Matcher regexMatcher = regex.matcher("12 54 1 65");
try {
    String resultString = regexMatcher.replaceAll("$1");
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

works fine, but I can't change the $1 :(

edit2:

Now, it's working :)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Robert Harvey Feb 23 '11 at 21:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Incase other user experience a similar problem, could you elaborate what you did to correct the issue? :) –  doomspork Aug 14 '09 at 13:57
    
I wouldn't know how to do it in Java, but in Perl that's easy peasy. :-P $foo = '12 54 1 65'; $foo =~ s/(\d{1,2})/$1 * 3/eg; –  Chris Jester-Young Aug 14 '09 at 13:59
    
here was an answer that described how to do it, i don't know where it is now... (I've accepted a question that solves the problem, but disappeared. Strange...) –  user Aug 14 '09 at 15:57
    
I think the answer for [this question][1] could help you. [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/375420/… –  arsenbonbon Feb 23 '11 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The definitive solution to this problem was posted by Elliott Hughes on his blog a couple years ago. Elliott keeps introducing pointless dependencies to other classes in the online version, so I'll post a stand-alone version here (the dependencies are only in the tests in the main() method).

import java.util.regex.*;

/**
 * A Rewriter does a global substitution in the strings passed to its
 * 'rewrite' method. It uses the pattern supplied to its constructor, and is
 * like 'String.replaceAll' except for the fact that its replacement strings
 * are generated by invoking a method you write, rather than from another
 * string. This class is supposed to be equivalent to Ruby's 'gsub' when
 * given a block. This is the nicest syntax I've managed to come up with in
 * Java so far. It's not too bad, and might actually be preferable if you
 * want to do the same rewriting to a number of strings in the same method
 * or class. See the example 'main' for a sample of how to use this class.
 *
 * @author Elliott Hughes
 */
public abstract class Rewriter
{
  private Pattern pattern;
  private Matcher matcher;

  /**
   * Constructs a rewriter using the given regular expression; the syntax is
   * the same as for 'Pattern.compile'.
   */
  public Rewriter(String regex)
  {
    this.pattern = Pattern.compile(regex);
  }

  /**
   * Returns the input subsequence captured by the given group during the
   * previous match operation.
   */
  public String group(int i)
  {
    return matcher.group(i);
  }

  /**
   * Overridden to compute a replacement for each match. Use the method
   * 'group' to access the captured groups.
   */
  public abstract String replacement();

  /**
   * Returns the result of rewriting 'original' by invoking the method
   * 'replacement' for each match of the regular expression supplied to the
   * constructor.
   */
  public String rewrite(CharSequence original)
  {
    this.matcher = pattern.matcher(original);
    StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer(original.length());
    while (matcher.find())
    {
      matcher.appendReplacement(result, "");
      result.append(replacement());
    }
    matcher.appendTail(result);
    return result.toString();
  }



  public static void main(String... args) throws Exception
  {
    String str = "12 54 1 65";

    // anonymous subclass
    Rewriter tripler = new Rewriter("(\\d{1,2})")
    {
      public String replacement()
      {
        int intValue = Integer.valueOf(group(1));
        return String.valueOf(intValue * 3);
      }
    };
    System.out.println(tripler.rewrite(str));

    // inline subclass
    System.out.println(new Rewriter("(\\d{1,2})")
    {
      public String replacement()
      {
        int intValue = Integer.valueOf(group(1));
        return String.valueOf(intValue * 3);
      }
    }.rewrite(str));

  }
}
share|improve this answer

No, you can't do that with regex. Regex has no notion of numeric values, so doing arithmetic with numbers is not possible (assuming you wanted to convert "12 54 1 65" into "36 162 3 195").

Note that with some languages and regex implementations you can do this (Perl as Chris posted), but this is not a regex thing, and especially not a Java-regex thing. You said you have already resolved the issue, so I guess you went the "manual" way, converting each match into an integer and multiplying that with 3.

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