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I have to interface the thermal Printer with my AM1808 based on the Embedded linux.

I have interfaced a printer having only unidirectional communication, means i need to send only data and no need to receive anything from the printer for verification.

I have my own printer that need the bidirectional communication in which i have to send the data and same way i need to receive something from the printer to verify wether it has successfully printed the data or not.

Yes my printer gets hung when it has printed around 4000 bytes so i have to reinitialize it to empty its inbuild buffer.

Now my question is Once i have configured a UART port. do i have to enable or disable transmission or reception ? means it can work with both the transmission and reception enabled ? How can i do this please help me.

Wether I have to put printer on interrupt. ???? Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

All UART's I've ever worked with have independent tx and rx hardware. Assuming no hardware flow-control enabled, then if you can tx OK, your should be able to rx.

Wether I have to put printer on interrupt? - Well, on a preemptive multitasker, it's usual to use an interrupt driver, (or some variant, eg. DMA with interrupt on completion), yes.

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There most definitely are UART-based interfaces where you have to explicitly switch part of the line-interface circuit between transmit and receive modes due to only have a single shared set of wire(s), but that is unlikely to be the case with a simple printer. –  Chris Stratton Oct 8 '12 at 19:27
    
Ok I got your point but Is that possible to put the response of the printer on thread ???? I can provide you the code for that thread..... –  Parthiv Shah Oct 9 '12 at 4:58
    
void *ThermalPrinterThread(void *pThreadArg) { char recvBuff[255] = {0}; char tmpBuff[10] = {0}; dpu_uart_portinfo_t uart_info; while(1) { memset(recvBuff,0x00,sizeof(recvBuff)); if(ReadDataFromUartPort(g_ThermalPrinterFd, recvBuff, 1, 'O') < 0) { Dprintf(func, "Read error [%d]", LINE); g_printdone = 0; return NULL; } else { memset(&milk_slip_record,'\0',sizeof(milk_slip_record)); Dprintf("Thermal Printer Return", " %s", recvBuff); Print_Milk_Slip_On_Slip_roll(&milk_slip_record); g_printdone = 1; } usleep(500); } return NULL; } –  Parthiv Shah Oct 9 '12 at 5:19
    
If It will be on Interrupt then How can I do this ??? –  Parthiv Shah Oct 9 '12 at 8:47

I have interfaced a printer having only unidirectional communication, means i need to send only data and no need to receive anything from the printer for verification.

"... no need to receive anything ..." is probably a faulty assumption.

Your printer should have somekind of flow control to prevent data overrun. Character displays & line printers often can receive the data faster than they can display or print it. These devices use a simple comm protocol that does not have any facility for retransmission of lost data. So there's flow control to notify the host to (temporarily) stop sending data when the device's receive buffer is full.

A EIA/RS-232 serial interface can use either hardware (typically using the CTS control line) or software (embedded data, typically using the XON and XOF characters) for single-ended flow control. Linux serial port drivers and line discipline make flow control invisible to the application program once the serial port is configured.

Yes my printer gets hung when it has printed around 4000 bytes so i have to reinitialize it to empty its inbuild buffer.

This appears to be evidence that you are ignoring whatever flow control the printer is providing, and causing data overrun.

Now my question is Once i have configured a UART port. do i have to enable or disable transmission or reception ?

That's not the salient question. You need to determine what kind of flow control the printer needs, and then implement (i.e. configure) that.

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Flow: step 1 : I send my data through UART. step 2: printer prints it and when it will get linefeed it will send "OneLineEnd" for verification that the data has been successfully printed. step 3 : I read it and then send further data. step 4: when it prints upto 4000 character the printer gets hung so I have to reinitialize it. This is the Flow of the printer but how i can implement it that i can't understand...so please guide that i need to use interrupt or threading for the reception of response of the printer. –  Parthiv Shah Oct 9 '12 at 4:52
    
Data received from the printer is buffered, so there is no need for a thread to "capture" data. The OS will hold received data until your program requests it using read(). Your program can be a loop of writing to the printer, and then testing for a response, the "OneLineEnd", from the printer using read(). Note that read() normally blocks, i.e. your program is suspended if the data has not been received yet. Only the kernel can use interrupts. Your user program cannot use interrupts. Unless you are writing kernel device drivers, you should not be concerned about any interrupts. –  sawdust Oct 9 '12 at 9:45

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