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So, this is what I'm doing:

#id-form td {
padding: 0 0 10px 0;
}

#particular-td {
border: 1px solid black;
text-align: center;
background-color: #DFDFDF;
height: 30px;
padding: 10px;
}

I have a table 'id-form', on which I set all tds to have a padding-bottom to be 10px. But on one special occasion I want a particular td to have an around padding of 10px, which I set in the 'particular-td'.

Obviously, I put the CSS styling in sequence in an external file. But the final CSS which appears is having just padding bottom, and padding: 10px appears to be overriden.

I would want to learn why and how this happens? How do I arrange these rules to solve my problem, other than inline styling?

EDIT: I removed 'table' before #id-form in table. I was never using this, I just mentioned it here to be able to explain it better.

share|improve this question
    
CSS isn't my strong point, however, if you want THAT particular CSS element to have a padding, why not put it in the 'style' of the element itself? That's sure to override all the other things. –  ATaylor Oct 8 '12 at 11:11
    
@ATaylor inline CSS is not a manageable solution. –  Chris Francis Oct 8 '12 at 11:14
    
    
You don't need the table element selector before #id-form, as there can only be one element with #id-form in the page and the extra selector will slow it down ever so slightly. Just for future reference! :) –  Chris Francis Oct 8 '12 at 11:16
    
Edited the CSS, still doesn't work. –  Pulkit Mittal Oct 8 '12 at 11:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Because of CSS Specificity. A selector's weighting is evaluated based on the components that make it up, with id's given a weighting of 100, classes with a weighting of 10, and element selectors with weighting of 1.

So in your example:

table#id-form td

Has a weighting of 102 (table#id is 101 and td is 1), whereas this:

#particular-td

Has a weighting of 100. If you change your second to this:

#id-form #particular-td

You will get a weighting of 200 which will override the previous selector. Only as a last resort should you ever use !important, as this pretty much prevents you from overriding it further down the line.

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Thanks bro. Thanks a lot. It has been a pain for me to understand this stuff earlier! –  Pulkit Mittal Oct 8 '12 at 11:28
2  
Adding to this: Inline-CSS always has the 'highest weight' unless you use !important –  Rockbot Oct 8 '12 at 12:33

This has to do with specificity. table#id-form td is more specific than #particular-td. A rule with higher specificity has precedence over a rule with lower specificity.

Here are a few resources to get you started on understanding how it works:

About using !important, as suggested by others:

One might be tempted to use the !important keyword to sort this out, but that is rarely a good idea:

  1. It becomes a pain to maintain/troubleshoot
  2. It breaks the normal flow of CSS
  3. The rule cannot be overridden by other rules later on

It might take a few minutes to read up on specificity, but it will be well worth the time spent when you've got a grasp of it.

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1  
+1 for encouraging further reading - before I understood specificity I used to spend countless hours bashing my head wondering why it didn't just "cascade" as I expected. –  Chris Francis Oct 8 '12 at 11:29

You have two ways, either add !important after your padding for the particular-td:

padding: 10px !important;

OR, your selector altered like so:

table#id-form td#particular-td {
border: 1px solid black;
text-align: center;
background-color: #DFDFDF;
height: 30px;
padding: 10px;
}

Both are fine. Personally I don't like the use of !important if I can avoid it.

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Try this code, I have added !important to your css, in this mode can ovveride padding of table#id-form td

#particular-td {
border: 1px solid black;
text-align: center;
background-color: #DFDFDF;
height: 30px;
padding: 10px !important;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Would this work in IE as well? I have heard that this creates some problem with IE? –  Pulkit Mittal Oct 8 '12 at 11:22
    
Using !important is not the way to go here. That should really be the solution of last resort. –  Christofer Eliasson Oct 8 '12 at 11:22
    
I agree Christofer, plus here I'm trying to know the reason of this overriding, because no matter what, I can resort to inline styling at the end. –  Pulkit Mittal Oct 8 '12 at 11:26

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