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I have an image that represents a weight-lifting bar:

enter image description here

I want to put the Full Block Unicode character (e.g. representing plates) on both the left and the right sides of the bar.

I'm trying to do this with 3 divs:

  1. Barbell left: plates that go on the left side of the bar, right-justified
  2. Barbell middle: nothing left blank
  3. Barbell right: plates that go on the right side of the bar, left-justified

Here is a professional representation of the divs with a plate: enter image description here

I thought I could do this with floats and percentages on div widths, but I'm not having any luck.

Here is my most recent attempt on js fiddle.


UPDATE

I got the answer I wanted, but based on the comment, I discovered that using Canvas was the better route.

I was able to achieve a better result with this html:

<div data-role="page" id="p1">
    <div  data-role="header"><h1>Header Page 1</h1></div>

    <div  data-role="content">
        <div class="bar-canvas">
            <canvas id="_barCanvas"></canvas>
        </div>
    </div>
    </div>

    <div  data-role="footer"><h4>Footer</h4></div>
</div> 

and this js:

var WIDTH_FACTOR    =    .8; //80% of screen size
var HEIGHT_FACTOR    =    .1; //10% of height size
var WEIGHT_SPACER    =     2;
var ctx = $("#_barCanvas")[0].getContext("2d");

ctx.canvas.width  = (window.innerWidth    *    WIDTH_FACTOR);
ctx.canvas.height = (window.innerHeight    *    HEIGHT_FACTOR);

var bar_width    =    ctx.canvas.width * .8;
var bar_height    =    ctx.canvas.height * .1;
var bar_x        =    (ctx.canvas.width - bar_width)
var bar_y        =    (ctx.canvas.height * .5)    

var plate_stop_width    =    bar_width * .01;
var plate_stop_height    =    bar_height * 4;
var plate_stop_y        =    bar_y - ((plate_stop_height - (bar_y / 2)));
var rubber_plate_height    =    bar_height * 8;
var rubber_plate_y        =    (ctx.canvas.height / 2) - (rubber_plate_height/2) + (bar_height/2);
var small_plate_height    =    plate_stop_height;
var small_plate_y        =    plate_stop_y;
var left_plate_stop_x    =    bar_x + (bar_width * .3);
var right_plate_stop_x    =    bar_x + (bar_width * .7);

//Draw Bar
ctx.fillStyle = "black";
ctx.fillRect (bar_x, bar_y, bar_width, bar_height);

//Draw Plate stop left
ctx.fillStyle = "black";
ctx.fillRect (left_plate_stop_x, plate_stop_y, plate_stop_width, plate_stop_height);

//Draw Plate stop right
ctx.fillStyle = "black";
ctx.fillRect (right_plate_stop_x, plate_stop_y, plate_stop_width, plate_stop_height);

//Draw 45 lb Plates
var plate_width      = bar_width * .04;
var current_plate_height     = 0;

ctx.fillStyle    =    'red';
ctx.fillRect(left_plate_stop_x - plate_width, rubber_plate_y, plate_width, rubber_plate_height);

ctx.fillStyle    =    'red';
ctx.fillRect(right_plate_stop_x + plate_stop_width, rubber_plate_y, plate_width, rubber_plate_height);
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3  
If all you want to represent are square, fully-colored blocks, why don't you simply use a correctly-sized <div>? Or even better: use a Canvas and just paint what you want to paint. –  Joachim Sauer Oct 8 '12 at 11:42
    
@JoachimSauer ty. Canvas clearly the better route to achieve end result. –  ray Oct 9 '12 at 1:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I did it changing a bit your markup and css.

Demo (tested on Chrome 22 only)

HTML:

<div data-role="page" id="p1"> 
    <div  data-role="header"><h1>Header Page 1</h1></div> 

    <div  data-role="content">
    <div class="barbell-background">
        <div class="barbell-left">&#x2588;</div>
        <div class="barbell-right">&#x2588;</div>
    </div>
    </div> 

    <div  data-role="footer"><h4>Footer</h4></div> 
</div> 

CSS:

.barbell-background
{
    font-size:3em;
    line-height:1.4em;
    height:1.4em;
    position:relative;

    background-image:url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/ZmFY4.png');
    background-repeat:    no-repeat;
    background-position: center;
}
.barbell-left, .barbell-right
{
    position:absolute;
    color:red;
}
.barbell-left
{
    right:50%;
    margin-right:146px;
}
.barbell-right
{
    left:50%;
    margin-left:145px;
}​

As Joachim Sauer said, it's probably easier and more consistent to just use divs for the red squares...

Another demo

HTML:

<div data-role="page" id="p1"> 
    <div  data-role="header"><h1>Header Page 1</h1></div> 

    <div  data-role="content">
    <div class="barbell-background">
        <div class="barbell-left"></div>
        <div class="barbell-right"></div>
    </div>
    </div> 

    <div  data-role="footer"><h4>Footer</h4></div> 
</div> 

CSS:

.barbell-background
{
    font-size:3em;
    line-height:1.3em;
    height:1.3em;
    position:relative;

    background-image:url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/ZmFY4.png');
    background-repeat:    no-repeat;
    background-position: center;
}
.barbell-left, .barbell-right
{
    position:absolute;
    background:red;
    width:0.5em;
    height:100%;
}
.barbell-left
{
    right:50%;
    margin-right:146px;
}
.barbell-right
{
    left:50%;
    margin-left:144px;
}​

In both demos you'll see that a pixel "wobbles". Knowing the contents of the red square i could try to fix it.

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