Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having a little problem and I don't see why, it's easy to go around it, but still I want to understand.

I have the following class :

public class AccountStatement : IAccountStatement
{
     public IList<IAccountStatementCharge> StatementCharges { get; set; }

    public AccountStatement()
    {
        new AccountStatement(new Period(new NullDate().DateTime,newNullDate().DateTime), 0);
    }

    public AccountStatement(IPeriod period, int accountID)
    {
        StatementCharges = new List<IAccountStatementCharge>();
        StartDate = new Date(period.PeriodStartDate);
        EndDate = new Date(period.PeriodEndDate);
        AccountID = accountID;
    }

     public void AddStatementCharge(IAccountStatementCharge charge)
    {
        StatementCharges.Add(charge);
    }

}

(note startdate,enddate,accountID are automatic property to...)

If I use it this way :

var accountStatement = new AccountStatement{
                                              StartDate = new Date(2007, 1, 1),
                                              EndDate = new Date(2007, 1, 31),
                                              StartingBalance = 125.05m
                                           };

When I try to use the method "AddStatementCharge: I end up with a "null" StatementCharges list... In step-by-step I clearly see that my list get a value, but as soon as I quit de instantiation line, my list become "null"

Thank you!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

This code:

public AccountStatement()
{
    new AccountStatement(new Period(new NullDate().DateTime,newNullDate().DateTime), 0);
}

is undoubtedly not what you wanted. That makes a second instance of AccountStatement and does nothing with it.

I think what you meant was this instead:

public AccountStatement() : this(new Period(new NullDate().DateTime, new NullDate().DateTime), 0)
{
}
share|improve this answer

Use

public AccountStatement() : this(new Period(new NullDate().DateTime,newNullDate().DateTime), 0) { }

insetad of

public AccountStatement()
    {
        new AccountStatement(new Period(new NullDate().DateTime,newNullDate().DateTime), 0);
    }
share|improve this answer

Your parameter-less constructor creates a new instance of itself, but doesn't assign it to anything.

share|improve this answer

You are calling a parameter-less constructor so AddStatementCharge is never initialized. Use something like:

var accountStatement = new AccountStatement(period, accountId) {
                                          StartDate = new Date(2007, 1, 1),
                                          EndDate = new Date(2007, 1, 31),
                                          StartingBalance = 125.05m
                                       };
share|improve this answer
    
cannot my parameter less constructor was calling the other one, and I don't have the accountID so can't call it directly. Must use the :this like stated previously. or simply put a return in front of my new in the parameter-less ctor. Thanks! –  pmlarocque Sep 24 '08 at 15:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.