Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a struct with some members and I have an implemented operator== for it. Is it safe to implement the operator< with the help of operator==? I want to use this struct in a set, and I want to check that this struct is unique.

struct Data
{
  std::string str1;
  std::string str2;
  std::string str3;
  std::string str4;

  bool operator==(const Data& rhs)
  {
    if (str1 == rhs.str1
     && str2 == rhs.str2
     && str3 == rhs.str3
     && str4 == rhs.str4
       )
      return true;
    else
      return false;
  }

  // Is this ok??
  bool operator<(const Data& rhs)
  {
    return !this->operator==(rhs);
  }
}

So when I insert this struct to a std::set what will happen?

share|improve this question
5  
No, of course not. –  Kerrek SB Oct 8 '12 at 12:59
    
Your comparison function should satisfy strict weak ordering sgi.com/tech/stl/StrictWeakOrdering.html. You should ask yourself, does my comparator provide this behavior ? –  DumbCoder Oct 8 '12 at 13:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Nope, it's quite unsafe. The simplest way to implement it is through std::tie.

#include <tuple>
struct Data
{
  std::string str1;
  std::string str2;
  std::string str3;
  std::string str4;

  bool operator<(const Data& rhs) const // you forgot a const
  {
      return 
      std::tie(str1, str2, str3, str4) < 
      std::tie(rhs.str1, rhs.str2, rhs.str3, rhs.str4);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
std::tie is C++11 specific and I can not use it –  Industrial-antidepressant Oct 8 '12 at 13:07
    
How about std::tr1::tie or boost::tie then? How old is your compiler? –  FredOverflow Oct 8 '12 at 15:58
    
Thx, I will try it. I use gcc 4.6.3 for linux and MSVC2010 on Windows –  Industrial-antidepressant Oct 8 '12 at 16:04
    
boost::tie is working (for max. 10 members) –  Industrial-antidepressant Oct 8 '12 at 16:35
    
Both of those compilers should support <tuple> and std::tie. –  Puppy Oct 9 '12 at 9:08

Well your code suggests that if A!=B, that means that A<B which is definitely wrong, since it can as well be A>B.

You will have to implement your > and < operators the same way you did with the operator==, which means by comparing the objects member-wise. It's up to you to decide how to determine if A is "more" or "less" than B based on their members.

If you use the operator as you have it in any of the standard library containers, you will get UB.

share|improve this answer

No, that is not safe. The way you've defined <, a < b and b < a will both be true at the same time.

So when I insert this struct to a std::set what will happen?

The behaviour is undefined, so anything is permitted, and it will likely be different on different implementations.

share|improve this answer
1  
The behavior is not undefined. It's just wrong. –  John Dibling Oct 8 '12 at 15:17
1  
@JohnDibling The behaviour of that operator< is defined but wrong, the behaviour of using that operator< for a set is undefined. A set requires that if a < b returns true, b < a returns false, and if your operator< does not satisfy that requirement, one realistic possibility is that some methods of the set result in an infinite loop. –  hvd Oct 8 '12 at 18:02

You need to define operator< in its own terms. You cannot implement operator< in terms of operator==, although you may be able to do the reverse.

Consider the paradox in this truth table:

"a" < "b" : TRUE
"b" < "a" : TRUE

If your implementation of operator< yields the above paradox, which it does if you implement it in terms of operator== then you have not correctly implemented strict weak ordering. What you've implemented is a jumbled mess.

You need to determine which of the member strings take precedence over the others, and then perform a comparison between them in order -- from most important to least important.

For example, if the precedence of the string is, from most important to least important:

  1. str1
  2. str2
  3. str3
  4. str4

...then this yields the following algorithm for operator<:

bool operator<(const Data& rhs) const
{
  if( str1 < rhs.str1 )
    return true;
  if( rhs.str1 < str1 )
    return false;
  if( str2 < rhs.str2 )
    return true;
  if( rhs.str2 < str2 )
    return false;
  if( str3 < rhs.str3 )
    return true;
  if( rhs.str3 < str3 )
    return false;
  if( str4 < rhs.str4 )
    return true;
  if( rhs.str4 < str4 )
    return false;

  return false;
}

Using this, you could optionally next re-implement operator== in terms of operator<. You assume the inherent inefficiency of time complexity in doing so, however:

bool operator==(const Data& rhs) const
{
  return !operator<(rhs) && !rhs.operator<(*this);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I found a similar topic, where there is a similar solution here: stackoverflow.com/a/11703971/534381 But it is a little different... Which is better? –  Industrial-antidepressant Oct 8 '12 at 15:47
    
The linked one is better because I forgot to consider the case where "c,a" should not be considered < than "a,b". I will adjust my answer. –  John Dibling Oct 8 '12 at 15:51
    
This has been fixed. I think I got it right now. :) –  John Dibling Oct 9 '12 at 14:02
    
Yes, your solution is perfect. But std or boost tie is simpler. –  Industrial-antidepressant Oct 9 '12 at 19:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.