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I have a tenuous grip on jQuery, but am trying to learn the basics of adding regular Javascript to it. I want to 'save' a sequence of animates as a function, and then call that function via several different click events. What is the best way to go about this?

jsFiddle - http://jsfiddle.net/kfycP/1/

Simplistic Sample Code:

$(document).ready(function() {

function animateCube() {
    $('.test').fadeOut();
    $('.test').delay(500).slideDown();
}

$('.test').click(function() {
// Play "animateCube"
});

$('.link').click(function() {
// Play "animateCube"
});

});
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would assign the function to a var and reference it as the click handler for your events.

$(document).ready(function() {

  var animateCube = function() {
    $('.test').fadeOut();
    $('.test').delay(500).slideDown();
  }

  $('.test').click(animateCube);

  $('.link').click(animateCube);

});

If you want to execute some additional code, I would wrap the handler in an anonymous function.

$('.test').click(function(){
  // execute more code
  animateCube();
  // execute even more code
});
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You can simply call the function as follows:

$('.test').click(function() {
  animateCube();
});
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You just simply call the function from the click handler.

$('.link').click(function() {
   animateCube();
});
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$('.test, .link').click(function() {
  animateCube();
});
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Since you're trying to get to grips with regular JS, I think the most interesting approach for you would be using a named callback:

$(document).ready(function()
{
    function animateCube(e)//can be declared outside ready CB, too
    {//jQuery passes the event object to the function
        $(this).fadeOut();//? fade only clicked element?
        $('.test').fadeOut();
        $('.test').delay(500).slideDown();
    }
    $('.link, .test').on('click',animateCube);
});

What you need to know is that functions are first-class objects, and can be passed as arguments to another function, like you do all the time in jQuery (.click(function<---). That's why it doesn't really make sense to write .click(function() { anotherFunction();}); IMHO. You're creating a secondary function object on the fly, pass it to jQuery where it's called, and all it does is call the function you want to see executed. In fact, functions are called in a certain context ($(this)), and it's that context you might want to use. Wrapping a dummy function around it just doesn't add up. If you want some extra stuff added to a given function, just treat them as the objects they are. They can be arguments, the return value of functions, they can have properties, they gave a prototype(-chain) they can even be referenced by several variables at once, too... Consider this:

$(document).ready(//<-- open bracket: this is a function call
    function(){});//we're creating a function AND pass it as an argument

So, the ready method we called might look like this (it looks a bit more complex than this, but that's not the point):

object.ready = function(functionArgument)
{
    //the function we passed looks like a variable now:
    console.log(typeof functionArgument);//"function"
    //ways this function can be called:
    functionArgument();
    functionArgument.call(this);//call in current context
    functionArgument.apply(object,[1,2,3]);//call as a method of object, and pass 3 arguments
    functionArgument.bind(window);//bind global context
    functionArgument();//call in bound context
};

Functions are neat things in JS, and, again: they're objects, too, so they can be assigned properties, like any other object. In our example:

functionArgument.hasAProperty = functionArgument;
functionArgument = (function(originalFunction)//this was the original function
{
    return function()//<-- return a function, that will be assigned to our var
    {
         console.log('I used to be:');
         console.log(oringalFunction);
         console.log('Now I do even more! But did I loose my property?');
         console.log(typeof functionArgument.hasAproperty);//undefined
         console.log('Yes, but: ' + typeof originalFunction.hasAProperty + ' Not entirely!');
    };
})(functionArgument.hasAProperty);//passes a reference to itself

Let me know if this makes sense to you, It's untested stuff, but it follows the basic principles of IIFE and closures.

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Try this:

$(document).ready(function() {
    function animateCube() {
        $('.test').fadeOut();
        $('.test').delay(500).slideDown();
    }
    $('.test').click(function() {
       // Play "animateCube"
    });
    $('.link').click(function() {
        $('.test').fadeOut().delay(500).slideDown();
    });
});
share|improve this answer

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