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I am using Resharper for my C# project.

I have created some private global variables and typically I use the 'this' keyword to prefix the variable name (eg this.FirstName).

Resharper clearly wants me to use the underscore instead of 'this' but is actually bold enough to state that the 'this' keyword is redundant. There is no mention of this on the MSDN site; I was under the impression that regardless of what naming convention you use (use _ or this. or uppercase/lower case), it was ultimately down to the user's choice (even the MSDN site mixes it up a bit (although never within the same classes)).

Can any one clarify if they've heard anything like this, or if you feel that the redundant comment is just Resharper's opinion as the claim seems a little ludicrous.

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closed as not constructive by David Basarab, Rawling, Filip Ekberg, Clyde Lobo, Erick Robertson Oct 8 '12 at 16:46

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
All the answers for this question would be an opinion. There is no "correct" answer. I would suggest asking this on programmers.stackexchange.com which is have more discussion type questions. –  David Basarab Oct 8 '12 at 13:19
1  
by "redundant" it just means "not required in this context", aka optional and unnecessary... it isn't about being "bold enough". It is only strictly required if having it there changes the meaning. –  Marc Gravell Oct 8 '12 at 13:21
    
Yeah, sorry, I got confused with the word redundant and depreciated! –  Dave Oct 8 '12 at 13:28
1  
@DaveRook Your edit is really a meta discussion about the post and shouldn't be in the post itself, as it's not actually a part of the question. In any case, you can't delete the question even if you wanted to as there are upvoted answers. –  Servy Oct 8 '12 at 14:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

“Redundant” means unnecessary. Since the keyword is clearly not necessary for the compiler in those cases, ReSharper is right.

Whether you have stylistic objections is another matter. I’m sure ReSharper can be configured to ignore those uses if that suits you better.

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Other answers have explained it well, one thing to add: this can come in handy sometimes:

public class User
{ 
    private string firstname;

    public User(string firstname)
    {
       this.firstname = firstname;
    }
}

this is required here so it knows which one you are referring to, since they are named the same.

Other than that it is personal preference, for the most part it is redundant, however if you think it's worthwhile, you can remove it from Resharper's warnings. It will be under Code Editing in the options, and also in the Code Cleanup profiles if you are using the Stylecop plugin.

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Personally I agree with Resharper and is the coding style I use:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly string _bar;
    public Foo(string bar)
    {
        _bar = bar;
    }
}

Prefixing fields with the this keyword is of course a matter of personal choice.

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Yeah, sorry, I got confused with the word redundant and depreciated! –  Dave Oct 8 '12 at 13:26

Forgive me if I've completely misunderstood your post, but my first reaction after reading it was that you may not be clear on the use of the "this" keyword in C#. It seems there's a blurring of the distinction between using a nomenclature for class member names and the scope resolution implied with the keyword "this."

At runtime, "this" always refers to the current object instance. Many developers use the underscore prefix to indicate class member variables as a matter of coding style.

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sorry - the fault is I got confused with the word redundant and depreciated! –  Dave Oct 8 '12 at 13:25

As an explanation, the this keyword is most useful when a human reads the code, as well as the private access modifier. but it is not strictly necessary because it knows to what field you are referring to, and if no access modifier is specified it knows that the implicit is private.

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1  
Actually, the opposite is true, it would be more correct to say that this is added at compile time wherever it’s missing (or rather, a different load/call statement is issued). –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 8 '12 at 13:19
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i never see a this keyword equivalent in the IL code, the decompilers ussually add them, altough if you have some refernce that i am wrong please share. –  Freeman Oct 8 '12 at 13:20
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Like I said in the comment, there is no explicit this keyword in the IL code but member variables / methods are handled differently from others nevertheless. The important point is that, contrary to what your answer says, the difference matters on the IL level, if not on the C# source level. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 8 '12 at 13:23
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The "this" in IL is ldarg.0 - you'll see that all the time /cc @KonradRudolph –  Marc Gravell Oct 8 '12 at 13:24
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@Marc so a 'this' keyword does exist even at the IL level? –  Freeman Oct 8 '12 at 13:25

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