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How can I get XE2 style rounding in the previous Delphi versions, so with SSE ?

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2  
I don't understand the question. What changed in XE2? –  David Heffernan Oct 8 '12 at 13:26
    
SSE rounding. But I ask this to share my knowledge, (I've edited the title.) –  az01 Oct 8 '12 at 13:28
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This feature of SO doesn't need testing. It is known to work. You are still expected to abide by the guidelines of what makes a good question. Please edit the question appropriately. –  David Heffernan Oct 8 '12 at 13:50
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@Tony If you are writing floating point intensive code then including bespoke asm can be worthwhile. Obviously there's a trade off but if your clients want your program to go faster, and using asm can make it go faster, then trade off can be worth while. I for one use a lot of bespoke x87 asm in my app. It gives around 5% speed up. Not much. But, it also doesn't cost me because it never changes. Arithmetic is like that. Once you have got it right, you never need to change it. –  David Heffernan Oct 8 '12 at 16:44
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Please rephrase your question to make it more clear what you are after. Things like: Why is SSE rounding important? How does it differ from rounding in previous Delphi versions? –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Oct 8 '12 at 17:31
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1 Answer

Inline Delphi assembly supports SSE instructions since a while. two overloaded versions are possible: for single and double. In addition two versions are possible: input as Parameter or as pointer. This version is particularly faster than the native Round()/Trunc() methods.

To round you have:

Function RoundSSE(Value: Single): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // additional PUSH/POP pointer stack added automatically
  CVTSS2SI  EAX, Value
End;

Function RoundSSE(Value: Double): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // additional PUSH/POP pointer stack added automatically
  MOVQ      XMM0,Value
  CVTSD2SI  EAX, XMM0
End;

Function RoundMEM_SSE(Var Value: Single): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // as written, fatest version
  CVTSS2SI  EAX, [Value]
End;

Function RoundMEM_SSE(Var Value: Double): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // as written, fatest version
  CVTSD2SI  EAX, [Value]
End;

To truncate you have the same with CVTTSS2SI / CVTTSD2SI:

Function TruncSSE(Value: Single): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // additional PUSH/POP pointer stack added automatically
  CVTTSS2SI  EAX, Value
End;

Function TruncSSE(Value: Double): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // additional PUSH/POP pointer stack added automatically
  MOVQ      XMM0,Value
  CVTTSD2SI  EAX, XMM0
End;

Function TruncMEM_SSE(Var Value: Single): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // as written, fatest version
  CVTTSS2SI  EAX, [Value]
End;

Function TruncMEM_SSE(Var Value: Double): Integer; Overload;
Asm
  // as written, fatest version
  CVTTSD2SI  EAX, [Value]
End;

To Floor, Ceil, use respectively *TruncMEM_SSE(value)* and RoundSSE(value + 0.5). These functions will give you a 20% perf gain. It has been tested in loops and in a real program (with a memory cache filled/ an instruction cache filled, so it can be considered as a real-life test).

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Given I want accuracy to x decimal places, why would I be using Singles and Doubles??? –  Tony Hopkinson Oct 8 '12 at 13:35
    
it is not to quantify –  az01 Oct 8 '12 at 13:38
    
In my trivial benchmark, the double precision RoundSSE is 3 times slower than the RTL's Round. This is of course for 32 bit code. I'm using XE2. With default project's Release build options. –  David Heffernan Oct 8 '12 at 14:42
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Now, you berated me and called me "stupid" in this thread. For using XE2 32 bit for my trials. Which has the same runtime performance as Delphi 2010 and even Delphi 6. If there's any stupidity, it's not my use of XE2. In a comment that was removed you said "why do you suck?" Well, I don't think I do. You need to take a look in the mirror and consider your attitude. Statements like that are never acceptable. –  David Heffernan Oct 8 '12 at 16:39
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Finally, I have learnt something useful in this thread. Namely that SSE instructions for rounding are a little faster than x87 instructions, but that the 32 bit compiler's ABI for 8 byte reals makes it awkward to take advantage of that. So thank you for giving me the opportunity to learn. I always appreciate that. I'm sure you knew these particulars already. It's really a shame that you didn't elucidate them clearly in the Q&A. The Q needs to state the problem precisely. And the A needs to include much more detail, and the benchmarks. This could be a good Q&A, but at the moment is lacking. –  David Heffernan Oct 8 '12 at 16:41
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