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This is a pretty complicated question, and I'm not a native English speaker, so I'll thanks if you are patient enough to read my question.

As Cuda is actually operating on two computers, it is invalid to point to a host's memory when you are on device, which means you cannot copy structs (or objects) to device if they have pointer members.

I tried to make the following system to solve this issue:

  1. use integers instead of pointers. The integer is an offset inside a memory pool. The integer is wrapped in a class (overloads "->" and "*") to make it looks like a pointer.
  2. the memory pool object manages a continuous array of objects, which can be easily transferred to Cuda device. The pool's content synchronizes between host and device, so an integer offset would have same meaning on both two sides.

To conveniently use the offset, it should be wrapped. In host side, the wrapper looks like this:

template<typename T>
class MemPoolPointer {
public:
    inline T* operator -> () const
    {
        return &( MemPool<T>::get_instance.get_object(_p) );
    }
    uint64_t _p;
}

We can see, the pointer class requires globally access of the memory pool. This is usually implemented by make the memory pool to be singleton. However, Cuda do not allow static members, and it limits __device__ variables to be file scope. How can I workaround these limitations? Or I should try OpenCL?

=================================== Finally it is solved. I can wrap a global parameter using a static class method like this:

class FooBar;
__device__ FooBar* FOOBAR_DEVICE_POOL;
class FooBar
{
    __device__ static FooBar& DEVICE_GET(uint64_t p);
}

template<typename T>
class MemPoolPointer {
public:
    inline T* operator -> () const
    {
#ifdef __CUDA_ARCH__
        return &( T::DEVICE_GET(_p) );
#else
        return &( MemPool<T>::get_instance.get_object(_p) );
#endif
    }
    uint64_t _p;
}

Thanks to everybody!

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using a pinned allocation? –  Kerrek SB Oct 8 '12 at 13:56
1  
Singletons: Solving problems you never had. –  Kerrek SB Oct 8 '12 at 14:00
    
AFAIK dereferencing, using pointer operations, at CUDA involves high costs. In my codes I generally use flat arrays. There are concepts like using SOA or AOS structures. At CPU we use AOS and at GPU we generally use Struct of Arrays (SOA). –  phoad Oct 8 '12 at 22:53
    
@KerrekSB what is "pinned allocation"? –  jiandingzhe Oct 9 '12 at 1:12
4  
Your class (singleton or not), can reside on the CPU, and own pointers to host and device memory allocated using normal cudaMalloc, etc. You can then retrieve device pointers (offset as needed) from the class at kernel invocation time and pass them to the kernel. I see no problem here... –  harrism Oct 9 '12 at 1:22

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