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Essentially I want to store a variable in the client that I don't want people viewing or changing.

In the following code example:

(function () {
    var foo = 'bar';
})();

Can anybody use tools or the browser to access and/or (more importantly) change the value of foo? Links to more information or tools that might do this would be appreciated. I'll be researching more in the mean time.

Thanks in advance

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6  
People can use the browser to completely rewrite your js if they so wish. –  geekchic Oct 8 '12 at 14:08
1  
The client can see your source and can do anything with it, it may not be a browser or any application you know of. –  RobG Oct 8 '12 at 14:09
    
...and this is all because Javascript executes clientside and not serverside. Don't rely on JS if it's crutial to hide this information from the user. –  inhan Oct 8 '12 at 14:11
    
As others have said, anything you send client-side can be seen by "people". Similarly, "people" can send your server any requests they want to. Your only solution is to not send any sensitive information client side, and fully authenticate/validate any user requests you receive. And there are many different ways to authenticate users. –  Mike Panter Oct 8 '12 at 14:19
    
I understand people can see the value in plain text. I should clarify that the value here is assigned via an API call. I'm aware of all of dev tools, but how would one set a variable inside an anonymous closure? If in the console you type log(foo), it will be undefined because it's not a global. It's also not part of a dictionary (object), so it can't be accessed as a member. –  Brian Cray Oct 8 '12 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes they can modify the values of foo. As a general rule, if you don't want the client to manipulate the value, don't give them access to it (I.e. put user id's or this type of information in the DOM or client side). You may have to do a bit of state management research, encrypted cookies, sessions or if you're using ASP.NET the ViewState/ViewBag etc.

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I'm aware of those dev tools, but I'm looking for a specific way someone could actually change the variable within an anonymous closure. If in the console you type log(foo), it will be undefined because it's not a global. It's also not part of a dictionary (object), so it can't be accessed as a member. –  Brian Cray Oct 8 '12 at 16:03
    
@BrianCray variables that are client side can be manipulated. For instance I could change the value of foo = "bar" to foo = "Darren" using my browser. I could introduce more variables as required and even send the data to your server using my custom variable data. What exactly are you trying to achieve? –  Darren Davies Oct 9 '12 at 10:34

It is possible to inject javascript into any page, and from there you can manipulate every javascript object/variable on the page. Therefore any data that the javascript is receiving should be encrypted (if security is your concern).

To give you a little hint, try open your developer tools. In chrome, Control-Shift-I. Click the scripts tab, then you will see all the variables the scripts is using. It is possible to double-click anywhere within the script and add/remove pieces of code.

F.Y.I if you are using Firefox, I highly recommend Firebug. It surpasses chrome's dev tools, but I find chrome faster.. At least on my slow laptop (Ubuntu FTW).

Hope this helped

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1  
I'm aware of those dev tools, but I'm looking for a specific way someone could actually change the variable within an anonymous closure. If in the console you type log(foo), it will be undefined because it's not a global. It's also not part of a dictionary (object), so it can't be accessed as a member. –  Brian Cray Oct 8 '12 at 16:00
    
With the correct break points in your code, any object/variable can be modified. They could place a break point just after you assign property to an object, and simply change it to what ever they want. If security is the issue, any data that the javascript is receiving should be encrypted. –  LukeStoneHm Oct 10 '12 at 12:28

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