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I'm writing a search routine where undefined and zero are both valid results. I'm returning a two element array like ($result, $answer) because I don't have an "undefined but true" value. It works fine but is a bit klutzy. A class seems like overkill.

Does such a thing exist or can be faked somehow? I'm thinking of things like the 0E0 trick, etc.

More details. This is the user interface I would like. The current routine returns two values, the result (whether or not the key was found) and a value if it was.

my $result = search_struct($key, $complex_data_structure);
if ($result) {
    print "A result was found for $key!  Value is: ", $result // "Undefined!", "\n";
}
else {
    print "Sorry, no result was found for $key.\n";
}
share|improve this question
5  
Succinctly, No. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 14:23
    
maybe dualvar? can be undefined in scalar context but in string will be true...? –  snoofkin Oct 8 '12 at 14:25
2  
To me this sounds like an XY-problem. You'd probably be better off asking about what you are trying to accomplish with this. More details, in other words. –  TLP Oct 8 '12 at 15:42
    
I still fail to see how "undefined" is a value for however deep a structure. What are you going to do with an "undefined result"? –  Axeman Oct 8 '12 at 16:21
    
I'll return it to the caller as the answer to their query. Up to them what to do with it, but it is possible to store undef as the value of a key in the hash, so I have to give it back. –  Bill Ruppert Oct 8 '12 at 17:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, but there are numerous ways you can return three states.

Solution 1

  • Empty list (return;)
  • Undefined (return undef;)
  • String (return "foo";)

my $found = my ($result) = search_struct($key, $data);
if ($found) {
    print "$key: ", $result // "Undefined!", "\n";
}
else {
    print "Sorry, no result was found for $key.\n";
}

List assignment in scalar context evaluates to the number of elements returned by its right-hand side.

Solution 2

  • False (return undef;)
  • Reference to undefined (return \undef;)
  • Reference to a string (return \"foo";)

my $result = search_struct($key, $data);
if ($result) {
    print "$key: ", $$result // "Undefined!", "\n";  # Note change here!
}
else {
    print "Sorry, no result was found for $key.\n";
}

Solution 3

  • False (return 0;)
  • True, and undef (return (1, undef);)
  • True, and string (return (1, "foo");)

my ($found, $result) = search_struct($key, $data);
if ($found) {
    print "$key: ", $result // "Undefined!", "\n";
}
else {
    print "Sorry, no result was found for $key.\n";
}

Solution 4

  • False (return 0;)
  • True, undef returned as parameter ($_[2] = undef; return 1;)
  • True, string returned as parameter ($_[2] = "foo"; return 1;)

my $found = search_struct($key, $data, my $result);
if ($found) {
    print "$key: ", $result // "Undefined!", "\n";
}
else {
    print "Sorry, no result was found for $key.\n";
}

BTW, I would pass the data structure as the first parameter and the key as the second parameter. More like OO programming.

share|improve this answer
    
#3 is what I'm doing now. #1 is the direction I lean towards. Thanks for this excellent answer. –  Bill Ruppert Oct 8 '12 at 17:51
    
fyi, you don't need the intermediary var. #1 can also be written as if (my ($result) = search_struct($key, $data)). The parens around $result are crucial. –  ikegami Oct 8 '12 at 17:56
1  
If you use #1, you might consider adding croak unless wantarray to your sub to catch places where you accidentally called it in scalar context (and thus lost the ability to tell whether anything was found). –  cjm Oct 8 '12 at 19:19

You could just return a reference to the result. Return undef for no result, \( undef ) for literal undefined result, \( whatever ) for any other result. Then the caller can just use $$result (after making sure $result is defined).

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You might return your answer in a list (not an array): empty list for no results found, and a one element list otherwise ((undef,) or ($some_answer,)).

It's still rather klunky, but:

if (my ($answer) = the_function()) { # note parentheses
  process_answer($answer);  # might be undef, false, etc.
} else {
  no_results_found();
}
share|improve this answer
    
@picrow That just occurred to me in the shower, second best place for ideas. Although I was thinking of undef for no result found and a one element list holding the result so an empty list would be undef. –  Bill Ruppert Oct 8 '12 at 15:43

How can "undefined" be also "true"? Why would you want such a construct? Don't you realize that for a function to return that it is undefined on the input, that such a result should not also be "true".

However, from Perl 5.10, here's the predicate not-a-defined-false:

if ( possibly_undefined() // 1 ) { 
}

But I think the zero-but-true is actually a better fit for a find function.

my ( $value ) 
    = map  { $repos->get( $_ ) } 
      grep { $_ } 
      $repos->find( $lookup_criteria )
    ;

The boolean in the find function represents the question "Did I find it?" The index represents the question "At what index?". If you fail to find the index, return '' or undef. Zero-but-true means "I found it at the first index."

However, you could always create a class with whatever boolean and integer interpretations you might want. The class below defines an object that can be defined as an integer in an integer context and as false when testing for whether or not the number is odd:

package Odd; 
use strict;
use warnings;
use overload qw<bool boolean_result 0+ value fallback 1>;
sub new { return bless do { \( my $v = $_[1] ) }, $_[0]; }
sub boolean_result { return ${ $_[0] } % 2; }
sub value          { return ${ $_[0] }; }
sub set_value      { ${ $_[0] } = $_[1]; return $_[0]; }

package main;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Test::More;
my $odd = Odd->new( 1 );
is( $odd + 0, 1 );
is( !$odd, '' );
is( !!$odd, 1 );
my $even = Odd->new( 2 );
is( $even + 0, 2 );
is( !$even, 1 );
is( !!$even, '' );
done_testing();
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is the same as looking up a key in a hash - the key might exist but the value for that key could be zero or undefined. So I want to distinguish between the key being found or not regardless of the truthiness of the stored value. I'm being lazy and trying to do it in one return value. I could build analogous function to exists I guess. –  Bill Ruppert Oct 8 '12 at 15:18
    
@BillRuppert, I tend to scrupulously delete from my hashes so that exists $hash{$key} <=> defined( $hash{$key} ). Occasionally, I'll use a defined set of keys with potentially undefined values--but that usually involves 1) undef <=> 0 or 2) a fallback hash with the default, resulting in this $hash{$key} // $default->{$key}. I can also have relative defaults and instance prototypes as well. –  Axeman Oct 8 '12 at 15:35
    
Sounds good, but I have no control over the structure being handed to me. It can be arbitrarily complex, basically a hash of anything at all to an arbitrary depth. The only assumption that I can make is that it is acyclical. –  Bill Ruppert Oct 8 '12 at 15:40

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