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When using Json.NET to serialize a MVC view model to json, I have a generic object property on my view model (public object Result { get; set;}) that is getting serialized to key-value pairs instead of an actual json object. Is there a converter I can use to force it to be serialized properly?

This is what is currently being output by Json.NET:

"result": [
    {
      "key": "AssetId",
      "value": "b8d8fb71-2553-485b-91bf-14c6c563d78b"
    },
    {
      "key": "SearchResultType",
      "value": "Assets"
    },
    {
      "key": "Name",
      "value": "abstract-q-c-1920-1920-8"
    }
  ]

Instead, I would want it to output this:

"result": {
    "AssetId": "b8d8fb71-2553-485b-91bf-14c6c563d78b",
    "SearchResultType": "Assets",
    "Name": "abstract-q-c-1920-1920-8"
  }

EDIT: To answer the question of how that property is getting populated, it is via a RavenDB index:

public class SiteSearchIndexTask : AbstractMultiMapIndexCreationTask<SiteSearchResult>
{
    public class Result
    {
        public object[] Content { get; set; }
    }

    public override string IndexName
    {
        get
        {
            return "SiteSearch/All";
        }
    }
    public SiteSearchIndexTask()
    {
        AddMap<Asset>(items => from item in items
                                where item.IsDeleted == false
                               select new 
                                          {
                                              Id = item.Id.ToString(),
                                              ObjectId = item.Id,
                                              ResultType = SearchResultType.Assets,
                                              Title = item.Name.Boost(3),
                                              Tags = item.Tags.Select(x => x.Name).Boost(2),
                                              Result = (object)item,
                                              Query = string.Join(" ", item.Description)
                                          });
        AddMap<User>(items => from item in items
                              where item.IsDeleted == false
                              select new 
                                         {
                                             Id = item.Id,
                                             ObjectId = item.UserId,
                                             ResultType = SearchResultType.Users,
                                             Title = item.Username.Boost(3),
                                             Tags = (BoostedValue) null,
                                             Result = (object)item,
                                             Query = string.Join(" ", item.FullName, item.Email)
                                         });
        Store(x => x.ObjectId, FieldStorage.Yes);
        Store(x => x.ResultType, FieldStorage.Yes);
        Store(x => x.Title, FieldStorage.Yes);
        Store(x => x.Tags, FieldStorage.Yes);
        Store(x => x.Result, FieldStorage.Yes);
        Store(x => x.Query, FieldStorage.Yes);
    }
}

Edit 2 Here are the Asset and User models (truncated for brevity, since they're just a bunch of auto properties)

public class Asset : IHasId
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
    public Guid AssetId
    {
        get
        {
            Guid assetId;
            Guid.TryParse((Id ?? string.Empty).Replace("assets/", ""), out assetId);
            return assetId;
        }
        set { Id = "assets/" + value; }
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

public class User : IHasId
{
    public User()
    {
        Status = UserStatus.Active;
    }

    public string Id { get; set; }
    public int UserId
    {
        get
        {
            int userId;
            int.TryParse((Id ?? string.Empty).Replace("users/", ""), out userId);
            return userId;
        }
        set { Id = "users/" + value; }
    }

    public string Username { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public UserStatus Status { get; set; }
}

Edit 3 As it turns out, when I step through the code, that object is actually of the type Raven.Abstractions.Linq.DynamicJsonObject, which contains an array of key-value pairs. So I guess this question might be more related to Raven than Json.NET. Unless of course there is a converter to go from key-value pair to json object.

share|improve this question
    
Could you show how are you populating this property? I guess you have passed some dictionary to it. Why don't you use an anonymous object? –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 8 '12 at 14:24
    
I edited the question to show how it's being done. It's via a RavenDB index. –  jwynveen Oct 8 '12 at 14:29
    
Could you show your User and Asset models? –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 8 '12 at 14:36
    
See updated question. –  jwynveen Oct 8 '12 at 14:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It would help to see how you are querying exactly, but you should take a look at the example on querying unlike documents with a multimap index on the RavenDB site.

When I look at your index, it seems like you are trying to do way too much in terms of field storage and encapsulation of your results. It's sometimes difficult to grasp, but the mapping done in the index is not to define how the results are returned, but rather how the index is built. Unless you are doing a Reduce or TransformResults step, you are still returning the original document.

So encapsulating the document as Result = (object)item is overkill. So is having a ResultType enum. If you need to know the type of document that matched, simply use .GetType() on the object and you will quickly see if it is a User or an Asset.

Here is how I would define your search index. Note there's some differences because there were properties you showed in your index that aren't in the models you provided. (I'm assuming there is a separate entity on the backend than the models on the front end, but adjust as needed.)

public class SearchIndex : AbstractMultiMapIndexCreationTask<SearchIndex.Result>
{
  public class Result
  {
      public object[] Content { get; set; }
      public string ResultType { get; set; }
  }

  public SearchIndex()
  {
      AddMap<Asset>(items => from item in items
                             select new Result
                             {
                               Content = new object[] {item.Name, item.Description},
                               ResultType = MetadataFor(item)["Raven-Entity-Name"].ToString()
                             });

      AddMap<User>(items => from item in items
                            select new Result
                            {
                              Content = new object[] { item.Username, item.FirstName, item.LastName, item.Email },
                              ResultType = MetadataFor(item)["Raven-Entity-Name"].ToString()
                            });

      Index(x => x.Content, FieldIndexing.Analyzed);
    }
}

And then I would query it like so:

var results = session.Advanced
                     .LuceneQuery<object, SearchIndex>()
                     .Where("ResultType:" + resultTypeName)
                     .AndAlso()
                     .Search("Content", searchTerm);

You can then simply examine your results and find that while cast as object, you can indeed do result.GetType() and see how that object is constructed. If desired, you could also put a common interface on your entities to cast to instead of object, such as the IAmSearchable shown in the Raven example.

When you finally pass your result back through MVC, it should be serialized properly, since it will be coming from the real object and not the raven DynamicJsonObject.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason I have it structured as I do is because I also have a facet on the ResultType property, so that the user can filter down to a specific type if they want. As far as how I'm querying, I'm use .AsProjection<SiteSearchResult>() so that it actually does transform the results to the type I'm expecting. –  jwynveen Oct 8 '12 at 18:24
    
I updated the example to show you a better way to deal with the concern of filtering by result type. –  Matt Johnson Oct 8 '12 at 19:01
    
Nice! That looks way better that what I was doing. I've been going in circles trying to figure out how to get this all done. With your example, am I still able to use .Boost() on individual properties of that Content array? –  jwynveen Oct 8 '12 at 19:13
    
Yes, .Boost() still works as expected. –  Matt Johnson Oct 8 '12 at 19:20

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