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My current stack is ASP.NET MVC 4 and Entity Framework 5.0. I installed ninject.mvc3 by NuGet and the code showed below works fine:

public class SessionsController : Controller
{
    // use "kernel.Bind<MyContext>().ToSelf().InRequestScope();" 
    // to inject MyContext
    private MyContext _context;

    public SessionsController(MyContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult Login()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(_context.Users.Count());
        return View();
    }
}

}

Now, I want to extract a BaseController for my controllers:

public class BaseController : Controller
{
    protected MyContext _context;

    public BaseController(MyContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    // I don't know what should be write here and 
    // base controller must have a parameterless constructor
    public BaseController() 
    {

    }
}

Then I make SessionsController inherit from BaseController. When I run the code, an exception throwed that

"Object reference not set to an instance of an object.(with MyContext)"

Do I use Ninject wrong?

--UPDATED-- the ninject's NinjectWebCommon.cs's code

    /// <summary>
    /// Load your modules or register your services here!
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="kernel">The kernel.</param>
    private static void RegisterServices(IKernel kernel)
    {
        kernel.Bind<TelesingContext>().ToSelf().InRequestScope();
    }        

--UPDATED-- the edited SessionsController.cs code

public class SessionsController : BaseController
{
    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult Login()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(_context.Users.Count());
        return View();
    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
Could you show code how to Bind and Get after you have BaseController? –  Cuong Le Oct 8 '12 at 15:13
    
Why do you need a parameterless constructor in BaseController? –  Adam Robinson Oct 8 '12 at 16:47
    
@AdamRobinson ASP.NET MVC framework requires a parameterless constructor of parent controller class. –  AntiGameZ Oct 8 '12 at 17:00
    
@AntiGameZ: Can you give the specific error message that's causing you to say that? Given that MVC shouldn't be dealing directly with the parent at all, I'm dubious (but I'm also MVC-ignorant) –  Adam Robinson Oct 8 '12 at 17:22
    
@AdamRobinson "Object reference not set to an instance of an object.(with MyContext)" that I have given above. The exception throwed is expected because when a controller created mvc will first call to its parent controller's parameterless constructor. Without any logical code relative to MyContext in parameter constructor, MyContext obviously doesn't initialize and the exception throws. –  AntiGameZ Oct 8 '12 at 18:36

2 Answers 2

Your problem is not with Ninject or MVC. You're missing a constructor on your derived class.

Because constructors are not polymorphic in any way (and instead can only be chained), you still have to define a constructor on your derived class that takes a MyContext and passes it to the base constructor:

public class SessionsController : BaseController
{
    public SessionsController(MyContext context) : base(context) { }

    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult Login()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(_context.Users.Count());
        return View();
    }
}

The reason that you're getting an exception is because if you define no constructors in your class and the base class has a parameterless constructor, the C# compiler automatically inserts a parameterless constructor in your class that calls the base. Because the _context variable was never being set, you were getting a NullReferenceException on your Login action.

share|improve this answer
    
At my scenario, I am afraid your code won't work. The parameter of SessionsController's 1 constructor will be injected by Ninject that make BaseController meaningless. –  AntiGameZ Oct 9 '12 at 2:59
    
I don't understand what you're saying. In what way will it make BaseController meaningless? –  Adam Robinson Oct 9 '12 at 3:12
    
When SessionsController initializing BaseController will be initialized first and a MyContext instance is given by Ninject. I don't know after that which MyContext instance is to inject to SessionsController. I think it will be the same one because I set the MyContext as InRequestScope. –  AntiGameZ Oct 9 '12 at 8:09
    
I'm sorry, but what you're saying (that the base class will be initialized first by Ninject) doesn't make any sense, as this is impossible. Have you actually tried the code as it's written? –  Adam Robinson Oct 9 '12 at 13:02
    
Yes, I have tried your code and Ninject's property injection and both of them works. The problem that confused me now is that if the context instance is the same though a single request no matter access from SessionsController or other controllers which inherit from BaseController. –  AntiGameZ Oct 9 '12 at 15:25

There really isn't much benefit to doing what you're doing. C# requires that you create a constructor for derived classes if you want use a constructor in your base class. Thus, you would need to do this:

public class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived(MyContext context) : base(context) { }
}

As you can see, it's almost as much work to derive from a base context, so what's the point? Other than to enforce a standard process.

BaseController only needs a parameterless constructor because you haven't defined how the base constructors should be called from your derived class.

Ninject can't magically insert parameters into the base class, only your derived class can do it.

share|improve this answer
1  
DbContext, Logger, AuthHelper, etc... So many things need to initialize or inject in a controller. I want to avoid these duplicate code. Could you give me some advices? –  AntiGameZ Oct 8 '12 at 16:43
    
If you have multiple things, wrap them in a container class and then inject the container class. Then you only have one to do. Another option is to use Property injection instead of constructor Injection, and place these properties in your base class. That's not really ideal though. –  Erik Funkenbusch Oct 8 '12 at 16:47

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