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I've been using Chrome for a long time now and I've never (well not that I can recall) come across CSS definitions in the Style panel that are faded. The selector hasn't been defined else where.

(Edit: Just to be clear, I'm not referring to the user agent stylesheet)

I can't figure out why it is faded and what this means. The definition appears to be editable but any changes to the values do not persist (i.e. as soon as I click off, it reverts back to original value) and has no effect on the web page.

I couldn't find any reference to this in the documentation for the tool. Can any of you kind folk shed any light on this?

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3 Answers

These are the stylesheets that are applied automatically by the browser.

You can see this by the description: user agent stylesheets.

You can disable this in the setting in the lower right corner by checking Show user agent styles. Now the styles won't be shown in your CSS panel (but are still being applied!)

EDIT:

i misread your question, the dev doc says the following about dimmed rules:

Note: If you edit the selector so that it will not match the selected element, the rule will turn dimmed and obviously, will not be applied to the element. You should rarely need to do this.

Your screenshot looks like this could have been the case.

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And why does it display Site.css as source next to them? –  Michal Klouda Oct 8 '12 at 14:42
    
mmh no, they're under "Matched CSS Rules", you're talking about "Computed Style" which are shaded too, but it's not what OP is talking about. –  Giona Oct 8 '12 at 14:43
    
mmh no again, the default color for h1s isn't #7F7F7F –  Giona Oct 8 '12 at 14:46
    
Hi Christoph, as the others have pointed out, I know about the user agent styles. Perhaps I wasn't clear, but I'm referring to the styles from my own stylesheet (Site.css) which are shaded/faded. –  Raj Parmar Oct 8 '12 at 14:58
    
@RajParmar see my edit;) I hope this now it's correct. –  Christoph Oct 8 '12 at 16:26
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The "faded" styles are ones that are not applied to the selected tag. So in your screenshot, you have an h1 rule which is normal colored -- that one is applied to whatever element you have selected -- and you have an .SubHeader h1 rule that is not being applied to the selected element.

You'll sometimes see this is you dynamically add a CSS rule (the + button in the chrome dev tools) but modify the selector so it doesn't apply to whichever element you have selected.

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Does Chrome display a rule for an element even if it doesn't match its selector? If so, that'd be weird... –  BoltClock Oct 8 '12 at 15:22
    
Chrome allows you to add and modify CSS rules dynamically. If you happen to add a rule that doesn't match your selected element -- or if you modify an existing rule so the selector no longer matches the selected element -- it will show greyed out. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Oct 8 '12 at 15:26
    
Ah, that makes more sense. –  BoltClock Oct 8 '12 at 15:27
    
I follow what you're saying Roddy however, the style in question (.SubHeader h1) hasn't been added dynamically (i.e. it's in the stylesheet and is definitely in effect (i.e. styled as defined). So it is being applied, just Chrome is not letting me modify it. –  Raj Parmar Oct 8 '12 at 15:35
    
Did you try restarting Chrome? That sometimes happens to me for no reason that I can determine -- Chrome just spontaneously decides that it won't let me edit a particular CSS rule. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Oct 8 '12 at 15:40
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It means that the rule has been inherited:

http://code.google.com/chrome/devtools/docs/elements-styles.html#computed_style

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Correct - but it also means that the style is not applicable to the currently selected element. –  drkvogel Mar 17 at 20:53
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