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Lately I've been contemplating whether I should start studying another framework since I only have a windows machine and I don't intend to make cross-platform software anytime soon. So to help me with that decision...

  1. Is there any disadvantage to using a cross-platform framework when I don't intend to develop cross-platform? Intuitively I would say that a framework specialized for a certain platform would perform better in said platform than a cross-platform framework. But I am just assuming that.

  2. Please enumerate frameworks and libraries that I can start studying for rapid application development on Windows using C++. One with lots of documentation is preferred. I would appreciate it if you included a link that can help me get started.

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What kind of application are you talking about? Do you need database access? 3D graphics? These things make a big difference. –  Ben Voigt Oct 8 '12 at 15:41
    
@BenVoigt I'm not planning on choosing a certain framework or library, i'm trying to decide what to study next, a cross-platform framework or a "native" framework. –  Subaru Tashiro Oct 8 '12 at 16:08

4 Answers 4

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Is there any disadvantage to using a cross-platform framework when I don't intend to develop cross-platform?

It depends on the framework. Most frameworks limit themselves to functionality which is available across all platforms, which may limit you somewhat. You may also not be able to take advantage of the best features of a given platform or the best development environment on that platform.

Please enumerate frameworks and libraries that I can start studying for rapid application development on Windows using C++.

A good option here is Qt. It provides a very nice C++ based framework for Windows and other platforms. If you want Windows only, there are other options, including the Windows Runtime via C++ (for Windows 8 development), or the Microsoft Foundation Classes.

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IMO MFC doesn't deserve to be on anyone's short list. Yes it's there, but there are many better-designed options. –  Ben Voigt Oct 8 '12 at 15:31
    
So you would still recommend that I learn Qt despite the fact that I only intend to develop for Windows? Interesting. Can you explain why you recommend Qt? Does that mean that there are disadvantages, but I'm not really gonna miss anything special or significant by using a cross-platform framework? –  Subaru Tashiro Oct 8 '12 at 15:35
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@BenVoigt No need to compare the items on the list. All I really need is the list. –  Subaru Tashiro Oct 8 '12 at 15:35
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@BenVoigt MFC did get a lot of improvements in VS2010, at least - I still don't love it, and think it's crazy, but if you're doing pure windows dev, it's got advantages (good documentation, fully supported with nearly all features, etc). –  Reed Copsey Oct 8 '12 at 15:39
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@SubaruTashiro Qt is really nice to use, even for "pure windows" development. I find it to be one of the most productive GUI frameworks for C++, and has a ton of really nice features. –  Reed Copsey Oct 8 '12 at 15:39

By using a cross-platform framework, you will miss out on platform-specific frills, like programmatic control over Windows 7 Jump Lists. Because of these things, it won't quite feel like a native application, but like a port of an application written for another OS. In many cases this doesn't matter.

A modern C++ framework built using templates isn't going to perform any worse simply because it's cross-platform. You'll simply miss out on features that don't exist on multiple platforms.

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Other than Windows 7 jump lists. Can you think of another situation where it does matter? You know, the first thing that comes into your mind. –  Subaru Tashiro Oct 8 '12 at 15:42
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@SubaruTashiro: Jump lists are just one example. Task Dialogs are another. Also, support for the Windows 8 App Store. I trust you can generalize to "anything that's not also available on Linux and Mac probably won't be in the framework". –  Ben Voigt Oct 8 '12 at 15:45
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I would say those features matter when you're trying to compete in a very busy market, where every last ounce of polish counts. If there's something special about your software (special data processing, or connection to a unique device) then you can do more than enough with a cross-platform framework. But if you're writing yet-another-instant-messaging app, you need the polish. –  Ben Voigt Oct 8 '12 at 15:47

Generally the issue with cross platform frameworks are framework specific.

e.g. wxWidgets - They are fast, but not too many GUI classes available. Documentation is not excellent however updated properly.

GNome - It is widely used but requires a heavy runtime deployment, bit more heavy in terms of memory usage.

These both are UI Frameworks. both are GPL and hence you can use it.

Nokia Qt - It is an excellent cross platform framework and it is not just yet another UI but a complete framework for cross platform development. However, problem with Qt is metaobjectcompiler (mod). It is a kind of language extension.

I would recommend that you opt QT as your next framework. It is being actively developed, lightweight, recently being open sourced and is available under LGPL lic.

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Technicality: It's not Nokia Qt, as Digia bought Qt. –  Cornstalks Oct 8 '12 at 15:30
    
So you would still recommend that I learn Qt despite the fact that I only intend to develop for Windows? Interesting. Can you explain why you recommend Qt? Does that mean I'm not really gonna miss anything special or significant by using a cross-platform framework? –  Subaru Tashiro Oct 8 '12 at 15:33

Just to second the other answers, Qt is a great framework (and is hopefully going to survive Nokia).

Cross platform frameworks have mainly two disadvantages: performance (often they add another layer that is not necessary in native platforms) and of course being cross-platform, i.e. often not supporting functinality that is specific to your target platform. With Qt, I never saw performance as a problem. Also Qt brings in so many libraries that actually extend what you can do natively in Windows, that also the second point is not really a disadvantage here.

The only problem with Qt is in fact the metaobjectcompiler (moc). In the beginning, you will stumble across some strange compiler errors, that come in the end from the moc. Just remember this and google for the errors, you will get used to this.

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And maybe I should point out that I prefer Qt Creator as IDE over Eclipse and Visual Studio. –  Zane Oct 8 '12 at 15:44
    
Re: surviving Nokia: it no longer belongs to Nokia. They sold it to Digia last month. –  Pete Becker Oct 8 '12 at 15:57
    
Good to hear. Thanks for updating me. –  Zane Oct 8 '12 at 17:26

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