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Is it possible to pass different objects as argument for 1 function, not making 3 functions

i.e

void someFunction(Object o) {
     //working with object, all that objects have same fields to work with
     // i.e. all objects have x, y fields and this function is working with it
}

Player pl;
Item itm;
Block bl;

someFunction(pl);
someFunction(itm);
someFunction(bl);

Maybe it can be done using templates or what? I dont want to make 3 functions with same code for different objects

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1  
o should probably be passed as const refrence, not by value. –  John Dibling Oct 8 '12 at 15:32
1  
Be careful to distinguish objects and types. Of course you can pass different objects to the same function; that's what functions are for. The question is whether you can pass different types, and that's what templates are for. –  Pete Becker Oct 8 '12 at 15:53
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, using templates:

template<class Type> void someFunction(const Type& o) {
     //working with object, all that objects have same fields to work with
     // i.e. all objects have x, y fields and this function is working with it
}

Note that you probably will prefer to pass o by const reference, not by value. I have done this here.

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I don't get this downvote. –  John Dibling Oct 8 '12 at 15:43
    
Not me, but I upvoted, clear and concise –  jozefg Oct 8 '12 at 15:58
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Yes, a template should work:

template <typename T>
void someFunction(T & o)
{
    // use o.x, o.y, o.z
}

You can pass by reference or const-reference, depending on whether you want to modify the original object or not.

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Given that OP originally passed by value, I went on the assumption that he had no intention of modifying the original object. –  John Dibling Oct 8 '12 at 15:35
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Templates can be used as an alias for a class of types. The following will allow any type to pass through the parameters of f.

template <typename T> void f(T & t) {
    // ...
}
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You can do this with templates or polymorphism (probably a parent interface with virtual methods to get and set relevant fields).

Templates will work and probably be well optimized, but will not allow new objects to be passed in later, regardless of whether they have the same fields. You will be able to compile new code and new objects to use the template functions, but existing calls will be stuck with a single type.

Using a parent interface and virtual methods, then making your function call those methods (presumably getters and setters) to handle the field manipulation will provide more freedom later, at the expense of slightly higher runtime and having to inherit from that interface (it will, however, allow new objects to be passed to the function at any time, so long as they implement the interface).

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1  
I agree with recommending templates, but you lost me when you regarded polymorphism as "more traditional", and when you said that templates would be restrictive. Both of those statements are sweeping generalizations based on assumptions. –  John Dibling Oct 8 '12 at 15:34
    
@JohnDibling When I think polymorphism, templates are not the first thing that comes to mind (the "more traditional" in my original answer simply meaning "not templates"). Templates can be more restrictive (particularly having to be aware of the type at compilation) but may also be easier to use. –  ssube Oct 8 '12 at 15:38
    
OK, but I'm still not quite there with you. Can you elaborate on what you mean by, "existing calls will be stuck with a single type"? –  John Dibling Oct 8 '12 at 15:40
    
With interface-based polymorphism and virtual methods, you can come back in a year and pass in any object which implements the interface and exposes those methods, and it will work. Even with calls to the function that were compiled long ago, deep in some other library or class. With templates, to work with a new type, the function has to be compiled using that type, you can't just pass in the new object (unless you take a lot of care to make sure the fields are in the exact same position, and then you still risk differences in size causing unpleasant behavior on the stack). –  ssube Oct 8 '12 at 15:44
    
Considering the OP's question, IMO both templates and interfaces should be mentioned, as both satisfy the requirements in different ways and are optimal in different circumstances. –  ssube Oct 8 '12 at 15:45
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A template should work, but without taking SFINAE into account, you cannot assure that all the given objects have some fields.

Another solution could be inheritance here some sample code:

struct Foo
{
    int x;
    int y;
};

struct Bar: public Foo
{
    int another_x;
};

struct Baz: public Foo
{
    int another_y;
};

void someFunction(const Foo &foo)
{
    std::cout << foo.x << '\n';
    std::cout << foo.y << '\n';
};

With this approach, you can assure that all the given objects have the required members.

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