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I am trying to get current time in C using time_t current_time = time(NULL). As I understand, it would return me the current time of system. I am later trying to convert it into GMT time using struct tm* gmt = gmtime(&current_time).

I print both times using ctime() and asctime() functions.

The current time on my system is GMT + 1. But gmtime() returns me the same time as current_time is. I could not understand why gmtime() is returning me same time. Any help will be appreciated.

Ok here is the code and the output: Current time that windows is showing is 17:54 (Stockholm zone; GMT+1). I want something to return me 15:54. Or perhaps my understanding is wrong ...

time_t current_time = time(NULL);

struct tm* gmt = gmtime(&current_time);
struct tm* loc = localtime(&current_time);

printf("current time: %s\n", ctime(&current_time));
printf("gmt time %s\n", asctime(gmt));
printf("local time %s\n", asctime(loc));

Output:

current time: Mon Oct  8 17:54:06 2012

gmt time Mon Oct  8 17:54:06 2012

local time Mon Oct  8 17:54:06 2012

Accepted Solution: From Simes

That's probably your problem. Check the value of your TZ environment variable; if not present, it will default to GMT. Cygwin doesn't automatically pick up the time zone setting from Windows. See also localtime returns GMT for windows programs running on cygwin shells

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Perhaps the time zone is not configured correctly on your system? –  twalberg Oct 8 '12 at 15:44
    
Try localtime function. –  Alex Farber Oct 8 '12 at 15:45
    
I have checked the timezone on my system and its GMT + 1 (thats what windows is saying). –  Ata Oct 8 '12 at 15:52
    
Also, localtime return the same value as gmtime and current_time –  Ata Oct 8 '12 at 15:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A time_t type holds a value representing the number of seconds since the UNIX epoch. A tm type holds a calendar value.

gmtime() just converts system time (which is always UTC) from time_t to tm. That's why the values are the same. If you want a representation of your local time (GMT+1), that's what localtime() is for.

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question updated –  Ata Oct 8 '12 at 16:03
    
I am stumped. The only thing I can think of is some weirdness with the compiler or similar that you're using, but the code you describe, as far as I can see, ought to do what you're expecting of it. Unless it's running in a virtual machine, in which case it's the system and local time settings of the VM which are relevant here. –  Simes Oct 8 '12 at 16:13
    
I am compiling the program using cygwin (gcc). –  Ata Oct 8 '12 at 16:17
    
That's probably your problem. Check the value of your TZ environment variable; if not present, it will default to GMT. Cygwin doesn't automatically pick up the time zone setting from Windows. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/11655003/… –  Simes Oct 8 '12 at 16:19
    
what sorcery is this –  Ata Oct 8 '12 at 16:41

time() returns the number of seconds since epoch. Which is equal to UTC (aka GMT)

Epoch was 1.1.1970, 00:00:00 in Greenwich, UK.

So in fact time() does not return a time, but a time difference.

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UTC is not aka GMT, they are 2 different things ,even they are almost same value, but not necessary. –  rkosegi Oct 8 '12 at 15:54

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