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I have a class with two properties and two methods. Like the one below for example. (please ignore the data types or return types, it's just a typical scenario)

// The methods could be invoked by multiple threads
    public class Stock
    { 

    private static int FaceValue {get; set;}
    private static int Percent (get; set;}

    //    method that updates the two properties
    Public void UpdateStock()
    {
      FaceValue += 1;
      Percent = FaceValue * 100;
    }

    //   method that reads the two properties
    public int[] GetStockQuote()
    {
        return new int[] { FaceValue, Percent};
    }

    }

I need to ensure this class is thread safe. I could use lock(obj) in both the methods as one technique to make it threadsafe but what would be the best technique to make it thread safe, considering the following:

  1. There are only two properties that is read/updated. So, not sure if locking inside the methods is a good technique.

  2. Will it be enough if I just make the properties thread safe rather than the methods or the class ?

  3. Also, is there a way to make the whole class thread safe rather than individual methods or properties ? Any recommended lock techniques from .Net 4.0 ?

Just wondering if I am thinking through this right or may be I am over complicating it considering these. Many thanks in advance to help me get this clear.

Mani

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In general, a lock is probably the simplest approach here.

A potentially better alternative would be to make this class immutable. If you make it so you can't change the values within the class once it's created, you no longer have to worry when reading the values, as there's no way for them to be modified.

In this case, that could be done by having a constructor that takes the two values, and changing UpdateStock to be more like:

public Stock GetUpdatedStock()
{
     // Create a new instance here...
     return new Stock(this.FaceValue + DateTime.Now.MilliSecond, this.FaceValue * 100);
}

Edit:

Now that you've made FaceValue and Percent static, you will need synchronization. A lock is likely the simplest option here.

With a single value, you could potentially use the Interlocked class to handle updates atomically, but there is no way to do an atomic update of both values*, which is likely required for the thread safety to be done properly. In this case, synchronizing via a lock will solve your issue.

*Note: This could possibly be done without a lock via Interlocked.CompareExchange if you put both values within a class, and exchanged the entire class instance - but that's likely a lot more trouble than it's worth.

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I edited the code, made the properties to be static and just appended the FaceValue by 1. Just to make it clear where I am coming from. The properties' value may be changed based on number of calls to the UpdateStock() method. So, not sure if I can solve this by making the class immutable. –  Everything Matters Oct 8 '12 at 16:05
    
@Mani Nope - you could still make your Stock class immutable for instances, but your static variables will need a lock when updating. –  Reed Copsey Oct 8 '12 at 16:09
    
Thank you Reed. I think, lock seems to be the simplest and yet safe way to ensure thread safe access to the methods. I would use lock(obj1) in both the UpdateStock() and GetStockQuote(), (obj1 as same object in both methods to lock.) –  Everything Matters Oct 8 '12 at 17:21
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There is no silver bullet solution for making thread safe, each scenario needs it's own solution. The most obvious is to use a lock, but in your example, you can simplify and use the Interlocked class and have this take care of making it an atomic operation:

public class Stock
{ 

    private static int FaceValue {get; set;}

    Public void UpdateStock()
    {
       //only a single property to update now
       Interlocked.Increment(FaceValue);
    }

    //   method that reads the two properties
    public int[] GetStockQuote()
    {
        var currVal = FaceValue;
        return new int[] { currVal, currVal * 100 };
    }

}

See Interlocked on MSDN.

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This isn't thread safe, though. If somebody calls Stock.UpdateStock(); while you call GetStockQuote, you could get the old FaceValue and the new Percent... –  Reed Copsey Oct 8 '12 at 17:01
    
oops, thanks, edited now. When I was writing it, I was starting to think that the OP may be best advised to structure their classes better - i.e. synchronising a class/struct, not an array of property values. –  OffHeGoes Oct 8 '12 at 17:59
    
This works, now, since FaceValue is an Int32 - but its worth mentioning that it might fail for other types. –  Reed Copsey Oct 8 '12 at 18:00
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