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I thought this would work.

typedef auto var;

But I get the error:

error: typedef declared 'auto'

Contrarily, it works with any other keyword:

typedef int num;

Why am I getting an error?

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5  
You might try #define var auto; if you are at it, use also #define begin {, #define end } etc. –  anatolyg Oct 8 '12 at 16:47
11  
Don't try to write another language in C++ - write idiomatic C++ so that your maintainers know what you did. –  Mark B Oct 8 '12 at 16:48
5  
@anatolyg: You might want to make it more clear that you can do that, but seriously don't. People might think that your solution is a gread idea otherwise... –  Grizzly Oct 8 '12 at 16:50
    
For some reason, the site doesn't let me edit my comment; anyway: what i wrote is possible but NOT recommended, because it makes code harder to understand. –  anatolyg Oct 8 '12 at 17:00
    
@Grizzly - had anatolyg just said "You might try #define var auto" and left it at that his response might have been taken the wrong way. His "if you are at it, ..." makes it pretty clear that his response was a sarcastic suggestion. –  David Hammen Oct 8 '12 at 17:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Simply, this is not an allowed use of auto. typedef defines an alias for a type. auto is not a type; when used in the declaration of a variable, it is a stand-in for the type of the initializer. If you were able to typedef auto var;, then var would not be an alias for a type.

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auto is a type modifier not a type and so cannot be typedef'ed

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That is no longer true in C++11. –  Zyx 2000 Oct 8 '12 at 17:00
    
It's completely true. auto is not a type in C++11. –  Puppy Oct 8 '12 at 17:46
1  
@DeadMG: but it's not a type modifier in C++11. –  Mooing Duck Oct 8 '12 at 17:47

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