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I'm getting an "invalid use of void expression" error regarding the following function:

void remove_data(char* memory, char* bitmap, int pos)
{
    int i;

    i = (int)test_bit(bitmap, pos-1);

    if(i != 0)
    {
        memory[pos-1] = NULL;
        toggle_bit(bitmap, pos-1);
    }
}

Now from what I've read on other threads regarding this similar issue this error pops up when the programmer uses something within the function that will generate an output. However, I'm failing to see what would cause that in the code I've written.

Edit to add:

The toggle bit function used in it is also type void and doesn't return a value.

void test_bit(char * bitmap, int pos)
{
    int bit;

    bit = bitmap[pos/8] & (1<<(pos%8));
    printf("%d\n", &bit);
}

I commented the printf line in test_bit but the error is still there.

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3  
Where exactly do you get the error, and what's the declaration of test_bit and toggle_bit? –  Zeta Oct 8 '12 at 16:56
2  
toggle_bit seems irrelevant, should show definition of test_bit –  CapelliC Oct 8 '12 at 16:56
    
void test_bit does have a printf, I was focused on finding the error within remove_data that I completely forgot to check the functions it called. –  Kali Oct 8 '12 at 16:58
    
@Kali: And there you have your answer... –  Ed S. Oct 8 '12 at 16:58
    
And what should be the result of casting no return type to int? –  halex Oct 8 '12 at 16:59
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3 Answers 3

However, I'm failing to see what would cause that in the code I've written.

Me too, because I don't think you have posted the relevant code. Regardless, I think this is probably your problem:

i = (int)test_bit(bitmap, pos-1);

Please show us the signature for test_bit. I'm guessing it returns void or you have forward declared it somewhere and accidentally wrote:

void test_bit(char*, int);

Since the function returns void (i.e., nothing) you cannot then proceed to cast the return value (which is nothing) to an int as you are doing, it makes no sense and is illegal.

EDIT: You have verified in the comments that test_bit is in fact declared to return void, so that's your problem.

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You wrote

 i = (int)test_bit(bitmap, pos-1);

Why have a cast?

Seems a bit stupid when the the function is

void test_bit(char * bitmap, int pos)
{
    int bit;

    bit = bitmap[pos/8] & (1<<(pos%8));
    printf("%d\n", &bit);
}

How the hell can you convert void into a integer?

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Since test_bit is void, you may not use its return (as in i = (int)test_bit(bitmap, pos-1);) -- there is no return value.

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