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Should I use Java's String.format() if performance is important?

I was wondering if is good to use String.format in Java apps instead of StringBuilder... so, I just write a simple test, like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
        int i = 0;
        Long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while (i < 10000) {
            String s = String.format("test %d", i);
            i++;
        }
        System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
        i = 0;
        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while (i < 10000) {
            String s = new StringBuilder().append("test ").append(i).toString();
            i++;
        }
        System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
    }

And the results where:

238
15

So, if my test is valid, StringBuilder is faster than String.format. OK. Now, I start thinking how String.format works. Is it a simple String concatenation, like "test " + i?

What the differences between StringBuilder concatenation and String.format? Is there a way simple as String.format and fast like StringBuilder?

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marked as duplicate by RC., tc., WATTO Studios, Adriano Repetti, Deanna Oct 10 '12 at 10:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
One important assumption in your post is: "if my test is valid" ;-) You should read about how to create a micro benchmark in Java. –  assylias Oct 8 '12 at 17:53
1  
Remember that the first case is actually String.format("test %d", new Object[]{new Integer(i)}) which may account for a significant proportion of the overhead if the compiler isn't sufficiently clever. –  tc. Oct 8 '12 at 18:05
1  
String.format has to parse the format string each time, then do some fairly dynamic stuff to convert the arguments. Approaches using StringBuilder don't; the sequence of actions needed to build the string comes from the bytecode. Parsing and effectively executing a format string is likely to be orders of magnitude string than executing code. –  Tom Anderson Oct 8 '12 at 19:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I wrote a quick caliper benchmark to compare String.format() vs. StringBuilder, StringBuffer, normal String + operator, String.replace() and String.concat() methods:

public class StringFormatBenchmark extends SimpleBenchmark {

    public void timeStringFormat(int reps) {
        while (--reps >= 0) {
            String s = String.format("test %d", reps);
        }
    }

    public void timeStringBuilder(int reps) {
        while (--reps >= 0) {
            String s = new StringBuilder("test ").append(reps).toString();
        }
    }

    public void timeStringBuffer(int reps) {
        while (--reps >= 0) {
            String s = new StringBuffer("test ").append(reps).toString();
        }
    }

    public void timeStringPlusOperator(int reps) {
        while (--reps >= 0) {
            String s = "test " + reps;
        }
    }

    public void timeReplace(int reps) {
        while (--reps >= 0) {
            String s = "test {}".replace("{}", String.valueOf(reps));
        }
    }

    public void timeStringConcat(int reps) {
        while (--reps >= 0) {
            String s = "test ".concat(String.valueOf(reps));
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Runner().run(StringFormatBenchmark.class.getName());
    }

}

The results follow (Java 1.6.0_26-b03, Ubuntu, 32 bits):

caliper2

Clearly String.format() is much slower (by an order of magnitude). Also StringBuffer is considerably slower than StringBuilder (as we were taught). Finally StringBuilder and String + operator are almost identical since they compile to very similar bytecode. String.concat() is a bit slower.

Also don't use String.replace() if simple concatenation is sufficient.

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1  
It would be nice if you added "test ".concat(String.valueOf(reps)) to the benchmarks since the special case of two concatenation operands is more likely to compile into that form (no benefit of a builder for a single operation). –  Marko Topolnik Oct 8 '12 at 18:18
2  
+1 very nice ;-) –  assylias Oct 8 '12 at 18:19
1  
I ran it (Java 7, OS X), and the gap between concat and StringBuilder is even wider. That surprises me, concat ostensibly does less work (for example, only one char[] allocation). The + operator is even in this case compiled using StringBuilder (this, of course, depends on the compiler used; I used Eclipse's). –  Marko Topolnik Oct 8 '12 at 21:03
2  
It's very important not to leap to hasty conclusions from the picture you created! Your test measures the time for one string operation! (The loops are only for test accuracy.) If you build a string in a loop, StringBuffer and StringBuilder are much faster than the + operator. Example result: The + operator may take more than a minute to build the a string of 500000 characters where StringBu{ffer,ilder} build the exact same string in less than 50ms! –  steffen Apr 10 '14 at 11:06
1  
@steffen Right, but then you could do something like builder.append(String.format(...) in order to get both readability and some speed. Appending to a string in a loop is indeed not an option. –  maaartinus Sep 14 '14 at 22:38

String.format is relatively slower but usually more than fast enough.

I would use format if that is simpler, unless you can see a performance issue when you profile your application.

Note: The String.format in your example is taking ~24 micro-seconds and won't be fully warmed up yet. I would ignore the first 10K iterations.

IMHO "test " + i is the simplest in this case.

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I have run a test post-JVM warmup (once the methods are compiled) and get similar results, with StringBuilder more than 30x quicker.

format: 943
stringbuilder: 26

public class TestPerf {

    private static int NUM_RUN;


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        NUM_RUN = 100_000;
        //warm up
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            method1();
            method2();
        }

        System.gc();
        System.out.println("Starting");

        long sum = 0;
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            sum += method1();
        }
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("format: " + (end - start) / 1000000);

        System.gc();

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            sum += method2();
        }
        end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("stringbuilder: " + (end - start) / 1000000);

        System.out.println(sum);
    }

    private static int method1() {
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < NUM_RUN; i++) {
            String s = String.format("test %d", i);
            sum += s.length();
        }
        return sum;
    }

    private static int method2() {
        int sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < NUM_RUN; i++) {
            String s = new StringBuilder().append("test ").append(i).toString();
            sum += s.length();
        }
        return sum;
    }
}
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