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I have a template class Foo that takes two (or more) template arguments. I want to use its type in a separate class Bar. See the following simple example, which compiles without error:

template <typename T, typename U> class Foo { };
template <typename T, typename U> class Bar { };
int main()
{
  Bar<int, char> bar; // quick example -- int & char could be any 2 types
  return 0;
}

The above is somewhat tedious, especially if Foo takes many template arguments and the programmer has to retype them all. I would like to have something like the following instead, but it does not compile:

template <typename T, typename U> class Foo { };
template <typename T, typename U> class Bar; // base
template <typename T, typename U> class Bar< Foo<T, U> > { }; // specialization
int main()
{
  typedef Foo<int, char> FooType;
  Bar<FooType> bar;
  return 0;
}
test.cpp:3:60: error: wrong number of template arguments (1, should be 2)
test.cpp:2:45: error: provided for ‘template class Bar’
test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:7:18: error: wrong number of template arguments (1, should be 2)
test.cpp:2:45: error: provided for ‘template class Bar’
test.cpp:7:23: error: invalid type in declaration before ‘;’ token

I am especially perplexed because this partial specialization idiom works fine for a single template argument; see the question titled: total class specialization for a template

Edit I realized that, at least for my purposes, I could get around this using C++11 variadic templates as follows. I still want to know why the second example doesn't work, though.

template <typename... FooTypes> class Bar;
template <typename... FooTypes> class Bar< Foo<FooTypes...> > { };
share|improve this question
    
So, what problem? You have 1 argument for template class Bar but Bar should have 2 arguments. Also, you doesn't know syntax of partial template specilization. Read some basic book about C++. –  Torsten Oct 8 '12 at 18:07
    
It is not exactly clear what you are trying to achieve here. I think you need to answer the fundamental question: is Bar's functionality parameterized by Foo or is it parameterized by the choice of T and U? If the former, have you considered "template<typename F> class Bar" instead, where you might pass Foo as F? In the latter case, are you just trying to extract T and U from Foo as a convenience? This page may also be useful: cprogramming.com/tutorial/template_specialization.html –  James Beilby Oct 8 '12 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your class template Bar<T, U> takes two template arguments, but your specialization is only given one:

template <typename T, typename U> class Bar<Foo<T, U> > {};

Did you mean to have Bar take just one template argument and specialize it correspondingly?

template <typename T> class Bar;
template <typename T, typename U> class Bar<Foo<T, U> > {};

Note that a specialization can depend on a different number of template parameters but the specialization needs to get the same number of arguments. It also works the other way around: a full specialization can have no template parameter:

template <> class Bar<int> {};
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is precisely what I as looking for. Thank you! –  Benjamin Kay Oct 8 '12 at 18:14
1  
+1 Nice explanation, I wasn't quite sure what he was looking to achieve. This makes it very clear :) –  John Humphreys - w00te Oct 8 '12 at 18:16

I'm a little confused about what you're trying to do in this line:

template <typename T, typename U> class Bar< Foo<T, U> > { }; // specialization

You're stating that the template requires two types, T and U, as type parameters. Foo is itself only one type though, the type created by instantiating the Foo template with those two arguments.

I see that you're expecting it to pick up and determine the T and U since you used them in both places, but that doesn't circumvent the fact that you only provided one type argument for a two type template specialization.

share|improve this answer
    
Fair enough... what would I need to do to make it pick up both T and U so that I could have something like Foo<T, U> foo; as a member of Bar? –  Benjamin Kay Oct 8 '12 at 18:09
    
You will need to change "template <typename T, typename U> class Bar;" to "template <typename F> class Bar;" on the base line. The partial specialization line stays the same. –  James Beilby Oct 8 '12 at 18:15
    
For one, you can make Bar take only one template argument (as James shows). Then typedef Foo::T and Foo::U so you can access them from Bar. That would mean, of course that all template arguments you feed to Bar from there on must have these two typedefs, so you have to consider if this is what you want. Look up traits for more elaborate functionality. –  irobot Oct 8 '12 at 18:18

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