Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was confused when I first read Christer Fahlgren's comment on an answer on this question, where he states you would benifit from using 'MVC style design' when starting an application that uses both Delphi and a WebBrowser component on a form, and HTML with CSS and JavaScript to create a fancy mix of flexible UI and dynamically updating visuals.

I've been doing this in Delphi some time before I heard about Ajax, and a lot before I was hearing things about 'MVC'.

Perhaps this would be a good occasion to ask for help on the question: What does code look like that uses MVC design.

I've always understood paradigms much better by reading working source-code, then lengths of literature on some technical subject. What would a prototype textbook-example Delphi-WebBrowser-HTML-DOM-modifying application designed by the MVC pattern look like?

share|improve this question
    
If you want design proposals, you might have to state in more details how data flows in your application. What does the webbrowser acutally display? What parts exist in your application? Which of them are GUI-related? –  jpfollenius Aug 16 '09 at 11:29
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A very simple demo application demonstrating the general principle:

TModel = class
  property ValueList : TList <Double> read ... write ...;
end;

You could then have multiple views that visualize the model, i.e. one view that displays the values in a table and one that displays the values in a diagram:

IView = interface ['{0D57624C-CDDE-458B-A36C-436AE465B477}']
public
  procedure Update;
end;

TTableView = class (TInterfacedObject, IView)
private
  FModel : TModel;
  FController : TController;
public
  procedure Update;
end;

TDiagramView = class (TInterfacedObject, IView)
private
  FModel : TModel;
  FController : TController;
public
  procedure Update;
end;

The views do only read data from the model. All interaction with the GUI is delegated to the controller class (which uses the Observer design pattern by the way):

TController = class
private
  FModel : TModel;
  FViewList : TList <IView>;
private
  procedure UpdateViews;
public
  procedure AddDataValue (Value : Double);
end;

The implementation of AddDataValue could look something like:

procedure TController.AddDataValue (Value : Double);
begin
  FModel.ValueList.Add (Value);
  UpdateViews;
end;

procedure TController.UpdateViews;
var
  View : IView;
begin
  for View in FViewList do
    View.Update;
end;

This way you achieve multiple things:

  • You can easily use multiple views (either allow the user to switch beetween views, or show them simultaneously)
  • All data is in the model and completely separated from the presentation. Change the representation, change nothing in the model.
  • To implement persistance you only have to save the model.
  • You could use the controller to execute all necessary checks. (Instead of implementing this for each view)

For a complete list of advantages, the web is full of discussion of the MVC pattern and its alternatives.

In Delphi applications you may find that the controller is kind of overhead because of the event-based programming style in Delphi. What I often do is to only split my application into model and view.

share|improve this answer
    
Aah, yes, now we're getting somewhere. So, in a Delphi application that only has a single TWebBrowser to show HTML, the controller could be the thing that pulls HTML from the 'view' and puts it in the WebBrowser component? –  Stijn Sanders Aug 17 '09 at 9:01
    
I would see the webbrowser as the view displaying HTML. Another view for HTML might be a tree showing the structure of the HTML document. –  jpfollenius Aug 17 '09 at 9:06
add comment

MVC stands for "Model-View-Controller". So, an application that uses MVC makes it's interfaces in the following way:

  • have classes that encapsulate business rules on the business layer (which is the "Model" on MVC)

  • a form (on a desktop application) or a html(jsp, asp.net, coldfusion, etc) page, which is the visual presentation of functionality for the user. (it's the "View")

  • a class (or a method, depends of the complexity) that modifies the "View", making it act on the desired behavior. (the "Controller")

So the controller is tied on the model and view. The view is not tied to a specific controller (so it can reused on another part), nor the Model.

It's the controller that makes things happen. It interects with the Model classes and controls the view's behavior.

This is what I understand for MVC.

share|improve this answer
2  
Typically the controller modifies the model, not the view. –  SeanX Aug 16 '09 at 8:02
    
This all sounds nice, but do you happen to have a plain and simple demo application that shows how this takes place in code? I've updated the question a bit accordingly. –  Stijn Sanders Aug 16 '09 at 9:59
    
@SeanX: Huh? AFAIK, view is a static thing, commandered by the controller. Is the controller that makes things happen. –  Fabricio Araujo Aug 17 '09 at 17:52
    
The view gets all it needs from the model. The controller changes the model. That's how I understand it. –  jpfollenius Aug 18 '09 at 6:42
add comment

I think Smasher explained the basics well. Why I was thinking MVC is a good style is that the Delphi part would be the model and the controller, the HTML+CSS+Javascript defines a view by calling in to a late-bound COM component defined in the Delphi app. Here is a nice article: How to call Delphi code from scripts running in a TWebBrowser explaining how to make calls from Javascript in to Delphi.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.